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sábado, 20 de noviembre de 2010

Ayurveda

mmmmmmmmmmmm

Arjuna


b8ikm4rfv.sreedharanaidu.provectus@blogger.com Stop wa-iting for ba.cteria t+o catch you -by surpri,se! Try +our .super effectiv'e antib.iotic and relax!, Inn'ovative m_edication _has been introd'uced rec*ently and no as_thmatic's are giv,en a 2nd ,chance. As_thma resu'lts in about thr_ee *million lost d'ays of work ,each year a*mong Amer.ican adults.+ Diets 'that p*romise easy- and steady, weight lo_ss are tri+cky adv+ertisements of 'cunning p_harmacists!!.! F'ew years in a new* locat-ion, mak.e people .sensitized to ne,w en'vironment and ast'hma return*s. Obesity* can s_trike not only' adults -but alsp, children and _adolescents ,t+oo. Take care .of your famil,y! .How does cholest*erol_ cause heart d-isease'? Learn ever+ything abo*ut your ris-k of heart att'ack. What i*s your lif-etime g,oal? I*s it resto,ring your potency!- 'Oh, man it,'s easy as A_-B-C! Discover -the. causes of chil_dhood as+thma and 'what you can do+ to pr.event a,sthma attacks. Anti'bio+tics work by +attaching_ to some *part of the bac+ter,ia and destroy*ing it._ Choose your dr+ug. 'Discover which ,foods a*re most l,ikely to ca'use a breat.hing problem,* & take ,preventive ste'ps'! Eating disorde*rs, such as -binge +eating or b+ulimi.a often lead to we-ight diso*rders, & even to obes'ity. Do you* kno'w any home reme+die-s or tricks for as.thma.? I can +share some gr*eat tri_cks with you!- You sho.uld not be a,fraid of .pain relie.f drugs but *you should ta-ke t+hem responsi+bly, remember!' Severe- asthm*a can be life-*threatening. if not ,recognis+ed or manage_d correctl+y, with medic-ine,. Don't be stup_id to mis+s the chan*ce to buy_ best ere_ctile dysfunctio'n drug at' half pri'ce! Women ten'd to e+at much sweet 'and fatty. food when' they+ are de_pressed. Th+e first ste,ps to obesit+y. Antibiotic*s are. medicines use*d to treat in*fectio-ns caused by* bacteri-a, they're_ useless to +virus.es. 20 m-illion chi,ldren under t'he age of .5 years have b*een rec*orded ove.rweight 'globally in 200*5. About 6.6 pe_rcent of U.S*. adults were est*imat,ed to be _overweight or+ obese b_y the 2003-2004.+ Learn m.ore about *adult-onset +asthma a'nd how y'ou can treat t_he sympto'ms 'to breathe easi.ly. Whe,n asthma sympto_ms get ,more *intense and/or ad*diti-onal sympt+oms appear, th*is is a+n attack+. Cholester_ol, a chemi*cal compound +produ,ced by the bod+y, is a c_ombinatio.n of fat and st_eroid. Teens. r'eport many rea.sons for ab.using +prescription an*d ove_r-the-counter dr-ugs -like painkillers.. Anti.biotics are.n't smart eno_ug-h to destroy only t,he *bad bacteria. You, should _be very at+tentive! .You shoul,d never g-et ove,rexcited when st*ruggling +with -your extra kilo+s. Act r+easonably, dude!' 'The bad news is .that a_ntibiotics can't ,distin-guish betwee,n th'e "good" *and the "bad" .bacter-ia. Asthma is a+lso commonly d'i-agnosed af'ter sympto.ms arise dur*ing exercise.' Are you _okay now? Und'erstanding t*he changes' tha*t occur in asth*ma, and ho_w i*t can beha-ve over tim-e is vital. Some 'peo,ple with 'asthma may go fo_r exte'nded perio+ds without_ having any sy.mpt,oms. Obesity causes- significa_nt health. p.roblems. But you ,aren't -in danger if y*our- eating mo*de is healthy!+ A br_oad spectru-m antibio.tic is usef.ul for trea*ting infection,s that might _be ca,used by 'bacteria. Commo.n asthma sym-ptoms inc-lude coughi*ng, espec_ia_lly at night, whe+ezing *and press'ure. The main +differen*ce of th'is impot+ence treatment is t+hat it -really w_orks! See -yourself! Pl'ants such+ as poiso'n ivy, oak an.d sumac ,are the most ,common+ skin allergy *trigger_s. Watch out!_ New horiz_on*s of love will b.e open for ,you the mo'ment yo-u try this am+azin,g sex medi,cine! Recent r_esearch finds .that use o.f' high-dose opioids+ does not, sig*nificantly incre'ase risk o-f death. The-re is _currently. no cure fo*r ast+hma and no single_ exact +cause tha+t has been ide-ntified-. Since t+he time whe+n impotence' knoc_ked at my door+ I have *tried doze-ns of useless+ drugs!, Though _asthma symptoms va.ry, they *includ.e cough+ing, wheezing &t_ight 'feeling in+ the chest. Althou+g-h these drugs h,ave saved _millions of .lives', the misuse' of an+tibiotics causes p_robl-ems. Many peop,le report diz,ziness a-s a co-mmon sympt_om following ad*ministrati_on of 'painkille+rs. It ,can be helpful- to know. some facts ab_out paink_illin-g drugs when you _are startin-g to take_ them. There_ a+re about 1 millio'n Cana-dians and 15- million .Americ'ans who suffe_r from asthma., We don_'t beli_eve in miracl'es, but 'we believe i_n great *power of med+icine+! Check it out +now! Sede+ntary +way of life is on'e o,f the most. popular reasons* for 'people to gain _extra wei+ght and su+ffer. +The extra we.ight you lose_ on a crash d.iet_ is likely to- come bac'k when you s+top it. T'hink about _it! Many 'of pai-nkilling drugs c'an cause* mild sid*e effects, suc.h as .constipa'tion and d.ry mouth. Our. top-,quality in*halers have alrea,dy saved. lives of man,y ,people suf.fering from a,sthma. ,About 95 per* cent of childr,en wit-h persis+tent asth,ma still have sym+ptoms into* their ad_ulth.ood. The body need,s some ch.olester+ol in order t.o f_unction properly. T*he mat,ter is ho,w much. Drast-ic and unr.eali+stic diet & behav'ior *changes, like, crash* diets can se+riously damage *you'r health_! If you are over.weight,+ you may have_ inherite,d it, bec_ause 'it has a stro*ng genetic *component.+ There is no+ place fo'r imp_otence in .your life!, When are you *going to un*derstand it,. ma'n? If your child- is pres.cribed painki.llers, 'be sure th-e medicine is- taken accor,din.g to instru'ctions! You may, hate go.ing to th-e doctor, let -alone as,king abo+ut peni*le issues or hair* lo-ss. So do I! N-arcotic *painkillers de-creas,e functions+ within the c'entral ne'rvous system.- Use saf.e drugs! *Unempl+oyment and im.potenc*e problems a,re major cause*s of depr+essio.n and suicid_e in men. _You may be giv+en ot_her medicines| 'such as a+nti-epileptic_ dru,gs to t+ake with your pai-nkil-lers. Narcotic pai_nkillers *decr*ease func'tions within the, central ner_vous s*ystem. Use sa+fe dr+ugs! Asthma is_ also, commonl,y diagnosed after ,symptoms a-rise du+ring exercis,e. Are' you okay no.w? Our s+pecial guest, Dr,. Kreuzla'nge will te_ll yo-u everythin_g about imp,otence .in men! *If you have asthm+a it _is very im.portant not to ,smoke a+nd keep away -from .smoking peopl.e! Asthma .often worsen_s at _night for ,a few reasons-. Do not fo*rget to take_ your me+dicin_e regular_ly. Since. the time when impo+te+nce knocked at my .door I h+ave t.ried dozens of u-sel,ess drugs'! When you eat mor,e calorie,s than your- bo-dy needs, +you tend to- gain wei_ght! Are you *ready for. it? Asthma i+s a 'chronic inflamm'ation of. bronchial tube.s that c,auses ,narrowing of_ the airwa'ys. Asthma af*fect,s as many as 1-0% to 12% o.f children i.n the *United* States. A.re your kids safe?- Gu,ess what th'at is: caused b*y po-llen or dus*t and results i.n running n,ose. and water'y eyes? A.merica's mo-st popular impo_tence. medications- have n.ever been th+at cheap! Tr-y out! Penici'llin is a c_om_mon cause of dru,g allergy.* Reactions, to pen-icillin cause 40_0 deaths. a year. *Some of stu,dies ha.ve been+ published r'ecently t,hat have added to. the knowl-edge ab*out ast,hma. I do not w,ast,e time on thi*nking a'bout my sexual pe+rform-ance! I t*ake a pill- and have sex*! I wil_l never bu*y another an-tibiotic beca*use this ,one has .proved its, efficien,cy. It's* the best! I 'have never be'lieved i'n medication,s like V_iagra, b,ut I man_aged to get rid *of i_mpotence! I do-n't ne+ed neither* miracles, n.or magic_ to have great sex_ at- the age ,of 55! All I n'eed is… 'It's eas-y to get r.id of erectil.e dysfun*ction if -you chose the. right. medication! +Try it out+! There ,is nothing surp'rising t+hat you hav.e faced proble+ms wi_th having sex 'if you',re 30! Antibio*tics will* not* cure viral illne*sses,, such as: cold,* sto+mach fl*u and some ear inf+ecti*ons! Asthma affec*ts a_s many a.s 10% to 12,% of children i_n the Uni.ted States-. Are your ki,ds saf+e? Yo'ung girls who+ stare a-t models from_ magaz-ines feel th-emselves defectiv-e. and eat too .much then. Al+though th+e lit+tle blue pill ha-s made .many a man. happy, there. are new +drugs on -the ma,rket. Sometim+es antibi'otics may cause- stoma_ch upsets, dia.rrh.ea, yeast -infections or other, pr-oblems. _What you should k-now about a-sthma sympt,oms t+o keep livin*g normal l-ife +and stay safe! I,t is impor+tant t,o let the -doctor know_ if your p+ain com,es back before the, next do,se is due. An.tibiotic+s ha.ve become +part of mode-rn life but ,few of us actu*a'lly know what .it exactly_ entail. Rememb*er,_ the mos+t general si*de-effects of a,ntibiotics+ includ-e nausea, diarr_ho'ea and etc. Th.e lesser kno.wn effec.ts of* obesity may als*o i.nclude inferti'lity, type 2 ,diabetes, and can_cer. Feel* free to ,improve yo'ur sexual pe.rformance a'nd live long+ and happy 'life of a w*oma_nizer! This i's the way ,I look but I -hat.e it. I loo_k like a huge b,alloon! 'I hope t.hese little pills_ will help- me!* I promis.e you that. the medicat+ion I'm talking_ abou*t will- improve yo,ur sexual lif+e 5 times! A*void alco+hol befo*re or durin.g sex. Or yo_u ma.y occur in an un-plea_sant situa'tion! Watch 'out! Regular exer.c_ise, like bik_ing or walkin.g, can lowe_r your k*id's risk for _cardiova+scular dise_ase. Tel_l your doct,or about a,ll the' side effect+s you observ*e whe*n taking prescr_ipti*on painkille_rs. Combined 'with lack of .exerc_ise, obesity c*ontr-ibutes to on*e third of ca*ncers of -colon & 'breast*. Obesity &' overweight oft'en are traced. to+ genes, a*nd the brain .can in*duce appet+ite tendencies. If' you h+ave bee.n diagnose,d with asthma y.ou wi,ll have to tak,e asthma medi-cines reg-ularly. I' always fe_el sorr+y about obe.se & overweight' people. +They -have so ma+ny problems +in the-ir life. It'-s not only your- body th*at suffe_rs from pain bu,t your .nervou.s system as 'well. Think twi*ce! Excess_ amount+ of f*at on your bott_om loo'ks awful eve*n if you hide -it- under fashion_able jean+s! The amou,nt of weight_ you need to* loose *depends on y*our hea_lth condition+ and yo*ur genes. T-here is no_ ideal m,edication ,for poten_cy improvement+ but thi.s amazing disco*very! Am_erica'ns spend -$10 billion a year* *on cholesterol +lowering drug.s. Think- about y+our money!' Obesity is f-ast becoming. .the developed' worlds bigg.est health pro_b'lem. Protec-t yourself f+rom it!+ Men aren't+ likely to visit* hea'lth professional,s & t,hey may m_iss chances to. improve -their health.* Men are l'ess' likely to visit h*ealth care -provid+ers & they +miss. out on chances to .pre+vent illness. *Unfortu+nately, *antibiotics do n.ot c*ure the c*ommon cold', flu or a_ny other bad v_iral infec'tions. Hay fev+er suff-erers should ,wash ,hair at night+ to remove 'any pollen -and keep aw,ay fro'm bed. Al+most 2 out o'f 5 teens rep+o_rt having friends t_hat abu'se prescri+ption paink*illers & ,othe+r drugs. Accor_ding to a r'ecent sur'vey Americ.an men, had fewer health+ tests and+ investigat,ion's this year+. Many people bel,ieve th,at they +should on.ly get _help when the pa_in is becomin*g unbearab,l_e. The number of. new _cases and t.he yearly rate o+f hospitali_zation fo*r asthma, have increas.ed!, There a*re no cures fo*r allergies. Al,lergie,s can be ma,naged -with prop.er prevention +and treatme,nt. Little k*ids wit_h serious dis+eases -, it is ve_ry sad,_ but it often ha+ppens. Try -new al,lergy r.elief. General.ly, painki,llers are* categorized i,nto two. groups: no+n-narcotic a.nd *narcotic. Be, careful! Lon-g-term pl.an of obesi'ty t+reatment *thoroughly. discussed with y-our .doctor can be t'he be-st way! An allergy, can ma,ke yo-u sneeze, itch,' and wheeze.. Most peop_le w_ith asthma h*ave all_ergies. Early as_thma* warning signs inc,lu+de feeling- very tired, upse*t or *weak when exerc-ising. An _estimat,ed 14 mill_ion offic,e visi'ts to health ca_re providers .were+ due to allergic 'rhi_nitis. Do y.ou know_ the risks of* high ch_olesterol? Are _you sure abo'ut the food+s yo*u eat every. day? Sta,tistically, .men of. lower socio-eco_nomic statu-s tend to 'have -serious p.roblems with ere_ction. An.tibiotics w-ill no't cure, viral ill,nesses, such as: co.lds or 'flu, most co*ughs+ and bronchi-tis. Did -you know -that the num_ber of obese -children has* nearl+y double'd over the past '20 years.' Asth-ma is not* a psychological -co,ndition. H*owever, emot'ional trigg+ers ca.n cause fla,re-ups. Ne_arly 6 milli-on of people th'at .suffer from c.hronic a.sthma in. the United Sta+tes are child,re_n. What exac,tly are ant_ibiotics? A.ntibiotic.s are drugs tha+t kill' bacteria,* but n.one of viruses+. According_ to the Nat.ional A'udit Office, b_eing o'bese can take' up t_o nine years off y+our life.span. Changi_ng the d-iet may+ help a lot,- but some p_eople still' need drug_s t-o reduce their ch-olesterol.. Even' weight l-osses as small as+ 10' percent o+f body weigh.t can ,ensure that* you neve-r get obese! I_t is importan,t to l.et the doctor- know 'if your pain c-omes bac-k before the+ next dose *is due. Do' you -know the risk_s of *high cholesterol,? Are you 'sure' about the* foods you eat' every da+y? Even m'ild asth+matics can die o.f asthma, b-ut, mos'tly due' to improper car,e o+r delayed 'treatment. Allergy* can tak.e you all by +surprise ,all of a su'd.den even whe+n you are driv,ing a car!+ Take care!* Th+e truth is, of all -the. adults li_ving in t_he US almos_t one third *are obese! Ca*n yo.u imagine? I+t's all abou,t ultimate, masculin.e attractivene_ss and sexu_al perfor*mance! Le,arn more n*ow! There a_re .about 1 m+illion Canadi'ans and 15 mill_ion Americ-ans .who suffer *from as+thma. With all of t_he +stories of +food allergie.s swirling a.round in+ the press, y,ou ,should know th-e truth. Som+e studi,es sh+ow that breastfeedi,n'g decreases th_e chances for -a child t+o deve*lop foo.d allergies..'.. Failure to +achiev'e an erec.tion more than 5*0% of the t'ime, indi+cates a s+erious he_alth pro+blem. +When you eat- more calo_ries than your b_ody can co,nsume you s'tar,t growing' fat or b'ecome obese. _Not eve-ry asthma .medication i,s equally _effective. Read a.ll' the infor_mation about you*r drug_! Read mo_re about good hy,gi-ene and pr*eventive care to. reduce infec'tions an'd asthma ch+ance. We n.eed cholest,erol, but_ too 'much of it ca_n increa-se our r,isk of develo_ping hear.t disease.. You may, not have all, of asthma s.ympt.oms, or you .may have symptom*s at +different 'times. Unemp.loym'ent and impoten+ce pro+blems are major* causes of d,ep_ression and suicid.e in m_en. Obesity i'ncreases yo-ur risk o*f develop'ing age-relat*ed *macular degen'eration catara,cts & stro_ke._ People taking. stro*ng painkillers s*hould be c-arefu.l while experien.cing dizzin.ess when' driving.* Your genes *partly d'etermine h'ow high your, cholester-ol is. High- choleste_rol r*uns in famil,ies. If you. exper'ience repea+ted coug-hing spells, and ,yo*ur breathing* is noisy i_t may b.e asthma. I'f your ances.tors provi*ded you wit.h free tenden+cy to obesi_ty, you sho'uld th_ink abou*t this dru_gs. High, cholesterol_ can in-crease your c*hance of- having heart d.isease. Thin,k wh+at you e-at, man! Obesi.ty put-s a person at inc,reas,ed risk for- developin_g osteoart+hritis and hi.gh bl,ood pressure. Clonidi*ne ,— Hypertension,, High Blo.od Press-ure Temova,te Cream (clobe.tasol ,propionate, t*enovate, C-lobex,* Cormax, Olux, T,emovate, _Dermovate) 'Soft ED 'Pack (Viagr*a Soft T'abs + Ci+alis Soft _Tabs) [viagr-aciali.ssoft] (sildenaf-il, ,tadalafil) tri*can F*lovent — A,sthma, Inha*ler Day Afte-r Pill He.mophilia viagra_ profe'ssional pr.obenecid F_emale Pink Via-gra (Fema.le V_iagra, Pink Viagr,a, v*iagra for wome.n) Pinwo*rms septra_ ds i-nsulin glargi'ne atm Yashtima,dhu — Ayu_rveda, Duo'denal Ul+cers +Bacterial +Infections derm,ovate Tea_r Producti.on Coum'adin Menosan _— Meno*pause lagaquin+ A Abana* HeartCare trent.al _Propecia ('Finasterid*e, Proscar, Fin_car, *Finpecia, Finax,, Fina+st, Finara,. Finalo*, Prosteride, G,efina, Fin-asterid IVA.X, Finasterid. Alternova-) *bell's palsy- Acular' (Ketorola*c, ketorolac tr+omethamine*) Sinequan ('do*xepin, anten,+ aponal, de.ptran, Done,urin, Doxa.l, Sin'quan, Dox+ederm, Doxepin,- Doxin', expan, gilex, m*areen,* poldox.in, Qualiq*uan, Quitaxon+, Sagalon,- Sinepin, _Sinquan, Spect,ra, Xepi,n, Ad.apine) Minipress —_ .Hypertension, H+igh Bloo'd Pressure Antib+iot*ics Glucosamin,e & Chond'roitin (Chondr'oitin S,ulfate, glu-cosamine s+ulf*ate) trazore+l seleken Dim*enhydr'inate (Dramam_ine) — Nau+sea, Motion 'Sickness an*tifungal -SleepWell At+ri,al Fibrillation e*uglusid_ fenicol sensi_val+ Lovaza (Omega-3 .fatty aci.d) Chroni-c Ob_structive 'Pulmonary Dise+ase serophe-ne cymbalta V,astarel *(preduct,al mr, v+astarel mr, vast.arel lm, 'vastar+el lp, -preductal,- flavedon, flave'don mr, card'a*ptan, idaptan, ca'rvidon, 'trizedon,. trimeta-zidine) Viagr+a Capsul.es — Erectile' Dysfuncti_on, Male _Enhancem+ent, Erect*ion, Impot'ence male+ enhancement St,rok*e Risk Reduction- Relafen- — Osteoarthri_tis, Pain, 'Rheumatoid+ Arth'ritis, Joint +Pain_, Arthritis Join.t Stiffness' Mus,cular Aches Bonni+san D,rops acidity ka*rvea L-ioresal (B-aclofen, Kems.tro, Bac.lospas, pain,, muscle re,la-xer, musc'le relaxant) Vibra'mycin [vi+bramycin*] (Do_xycycline, Monod-ox, 'Microdox, Perios-tat, Vibra*-Tabs,* Oracea, Do.ryx, Vib-rox, Adoxa,, Doxyhexal, Doxyl.in, -Doxy) Karela —* Ayurve*da, Dia.betes, Bl,ood Sugar Py,ridium (phen-azopyridine, Ph,enazo, Ba'ridium, N+efrecil, Ph+enazodine, _Prodiu_m, Pyridia-te, Pyridium,' Sedur-al, Urica'lm, Uristat, U_ropyrine, U-ro+dine, Urogesic) + 2 Cialis (+Tadalafil, ,generic ,cialis) 9.04*%. Diamox (Acet_azolamide) Dia_re,x Symbicort ,(budeson,ide, formoterol) v,asospa*stic an*gina Accut-ane (Isotretin_oin, Amn-esteem, Claravi_s, Dec*utan, _Isotane, Sotre't, Or,atane, Roaccutan+e, Izotek, a_cu,tane, acne) q+uinimax Clar.inex [clari+nex] '(Desloratadine, Ne-oClarity,n, Cla_ramax, Aeriu*s) ca-psulitis Diclofe*nac [diclofen*ac]_ (Voltaren, Vov,eran-, Voltarol, Voltar,ol SR, Vol*tarol Reta'rd, Volt.arol Rapid,. D'iclomax SR, Dicl_omax Retard., Motifene,' Defenac-, Diclo*fex, Dicloz,ip, Dylojec-t, Fena.ctol, Flamrase, F,lamata_k, Econac_, Rhum_algan SR, Rhuma,lgan XL+, Volsaid SR), froxime ,cefura,x strep throat .weeke_nd prince *Jungle Burn* (Weight Loss+, diet, diet pi'l'ls) Hepatitis B al,benza- Avelox — Inf*ections, Pn,eumonia, B,ronc,hitis, Si_nusitis, Skin Infe_ctions que,llada, iritis angina +pect_oris colchi'medio Rheumatoi_d +Arthritis Tr_ichomoniasis- Kamagra [kam'agr_a] (silden+afil) asentra Hea-rtgar'd Chewab-le celebra vir,azide Birth +Contr,ol Haridra [ha.ridra'] Didanosine — HIV+ Rhinoc,ort [rhinoco-rt] (Budeson_ide*, Rhinosol-, budenase) Q*uick-Detox *2 Cia.lis (Tadala_fil, generi_c cialis) 9'.04% , Dyspepsia depr-imin Theophyl'line (-dimeth-ylxanthine, Uniphyl*) vere-lan Aldacto_ne (Spironol'actone,' Novo-Sp*iroton-, Aldactazid*e, Spiractin,, Spir.otone, Veros+piron, B.erlactone) +Female Pin,k Viagra, (Female Viagra, P,ink V_iagra, viagr'a for. women) Neem ,Clozapi-ne — Schizophreni+a, Sch,izoaffective Di'sord+er, Psychosis Ta*p,eworms Hypo.kalemia Clofaz'imine (l'amprene) z_itromax Oti-tis Media Blac.k. Cialis — ED Inc,reased. Urination Cys'tone celexa- dexamethas.one Sys.temic Lup.us Erythemato'sus amphic_ol Tylenol (,Paracetam*ol, A+cetamin+ophen, pain, a-nacin) Melpha-lan — *Cancer P+ro-Erex [proe_rex] ,Amikacin [amikac-in] .(Amikacine, +Amikin, Amicin, .Amikozit., Biklin, Lik'acin,, Miacin, Sele*mycin) ge*neralized anx*ie+ty disorder' glinate xop+enex Prednisol,one — 'Asthma, Uv-eitis, Pyode+rma Gangr_enosum, Rheuma-toid Art_hritis, U_lcerative Col+itis,. Tempora.l Arteritis*, Crohn's_ Disease, Bell+'s Palsy, M+ultiple Scl*erosis,+ Cluster Head_aches, 'Vasculitis, +Acu.te Lymphoblasti'c Leukem+ia, Aut-oimmune Hepatiti,s, System_ic Lupus E+rythematosu's, Dermato-myositis *pylomid .Ayur Slim Weigh_t Regulator_ — We_ight Loss, *Obesi*ty, Weight ,Management, Ayu+rveda lipot-hin o+rtho tri-cy.clen doxin Avel,ox [a+velox] (*Moxifloxacin hyd_rochlori*de, Vigamox,, Avalox, 'Izilox) Ales+se (-Ovral L) (L+evonorg.estrel/Ethinyl Est*radiol, *birth contro-l, -ovral) Lioresa.l (Baclofe-n, Kem.stro, Bac,lospas, pain, musc-le re*laxer, muscl'e relaxant_) vpxl D-uodenal Ul,cer levaxin *Trikatu+ O Ofloxa.cin (Floxin, E,xocine, Flob,acin, Flo_xal+, Floxstat, N'ovecin, _Oflin, Oflo, -Oflodura, Ofl.ox, Taravid,, Tari,vid, Zanocin)+ No.rvasc ( Amlodipine,* Dailyvas'c, Isti_n, Perivasc+) T_inea Corpo,ris viagrx Jelly ED_ Pack (Via.gr.a Oral Jel*ly + Cialis _Oral Jell+y) (sildenafil+ citrat_e, tadalafil, _viagra, cia.lis) 'miconazole Arj+una — Blood, Pressure, .Hypertensi+on, I*schemic H,eart Disease+, Trigl*ycerides, Ayurv.eda Yerba *Diet .(weight _loss, diet pil,ls) gas sine,pin 'Antiviral uroc,it-k Suregasm* —' Orgasm Enhan'cement Nasonex *[nason+ex] (Mom+etasone furoate,' Momet_asone) Nymp_homax - froxime m_iconazole karvea

viernes, 19 de noviembre de 2010

Novedades Blog BVMC - 4 noticias nuevas

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Vinaya - 4ª Parte - Textos Sagrados de Oriente









THE SACRED BOOKS OF THE EAST



HENRY FROWDE

OXFORD UNIVEKSITY PRESS WAREHOUSE 7 PATERNOSTER ROW



THE SACRED BOOKS OF THE EAST



TRANSLATED BY VARIOUS ORIENTAL SCHOLARS

AND EDITED BY F. MAX MULLER

VOL. XIII

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS 1881


(All rights reserved)



VINAYA TEXTS


TRANSLATED FROM THE PÂLI

BY

T. W. RHYS DAVIDS

AND

HERMANN OLDENBERG





2. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu is sick. If he sends a messenger to the Bhikkhus (saying), "I am sick; might the Bhikkhus come to me; I long for the Bhikkhus' coming," you ought to go, O Bhikkhus, if the thing can be accomplished in seven days, even if he had not sent for you, much more when he has sent (saying to yourselves): "I will try to get food for the sick, or food for the tender of the sick, or medicine for the sick, or I will ask him (questions referring to the Dhamma), or nurse him." Within seven days you ought to return.

3. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, inward struggles have befallen a Bhikkhu. If he sends a messenger to the Bhikkhus: "Inward struggles have befallen me; might the Bhikkhus come to me; I long for the Bhikkhus' coming," you ought to go .... (&c., as in § 2, down to): (saying to yourselves): "I will try to appease those struggles, or cause them to be appeased (by another), or compose him by religious conversation." Within seven days you ought to return.

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu in whose mind doubts of conscience have arisen sends . . . (&c., as in § 3, down to): (saying to yourselves): "I will try to dispel those doubts, or cause them to be dispelled, or compose him by religious conversation." Within seven days you ought to return.

5. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu takes to a false doctrine. If he sends .... (&c., down to): (saying to yourselves): "I will discuss that false doctrine, or cause another to discuss it, or compose (that Bhikkhu) by religious conversation." Within seven days you ought to return.

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu is guilty of a grave offence and ought to be sentenced to parivasa discipline. If he sends .... (&c., down to): (saying to yourselves): "I will take care that he may be sentenced to parivâsa discipline, or I will propose the resolution (to the assembly), or I will help to complete the quorum (required for passing the sentence of parivâsa)." Within seven days you ought to return.

7. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu ought to be sentenced to recommence penal discipline. If he sends .... (&c., as in § 6, down to the end of the section).

8. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu ought to have the mânatta discipline imposed upon him. If he sends .... (&c., as in § 6, down to the end of the section).

9. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu (having duly undergone penal discipline) ought to be rehabilitated. If he sends .... (&c., as in § 6).

10. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Saêgha is going to proceed against a Bhikkhu by the tagganiyakamma, or the nissaya, or the pabbâganiyakamma, or the paùisâraòiyakamma, or the ukkhepaniyakamma. If that Bhikkhu sends a messenger to the Bhikkhus (saying), "The Saêgha is going to proceed against me; might the Bhikkhus come to me; I long for the Bhikkhus' coming," you ought to go .... (&c., as in § 2, down to): (saying to yourselves): "What can be done in order that the Saêgha may not proceed (against that Bhikkhu) or may mitigate the proceeding?" Within seven days you ought to return.

11. 'Or the Saêgha has instituted a proceeding against him, the tagganiyakamma .... (&c., down to): .... or the ukkhepaniyakamma; if he sends a messenger to the Bhikkhus: "The Saêgha has instituted a proceeding against me; might the Bhikkhus come to me; I long for the Bhikkhus coming," you ought to go .... (&c., as in § 3, down to): (saying to yourselves): "What can be done in order that this Bhikkhu may behave himself properly, live modestly, and aspire to get clear of his penance, and that the Saêgha may revoke its sentence ?" Within seven days you ought to return.

12-15. 'I n case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhunî is sick, &C.1

Nota: 1. See §§ 2-5. Read here and in all cases where the messenger is sent by a woman: 'Might the noble ones (ayyâ) come to me; I long for the noble ones coming.'

16. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhunî is guilty of a grave offence and ought to be sentenced to man at t a discipline2. If she sends.. .. (as in § 3, down to): .... (saying to yourselves): "I will take care that she may be sentenced to mânatta discipline3." Within seven days you ought to return.

Nota: 2. There is no parivâsa discipline for the Bhikkhunîs. When a Bhikkhunî has committed a Saêghâdisesa offence, no matter whether she has concealed it or not, she is sentenced to mânatta discipline for a fortnight. See Kullavagga X, i, 4; 25, 3.
Nota: 3. The phrases, 'Or I will propose the resolution to the assembly, or I will help to complete the quorum (see § 6 seq.), of course are omitted here, because, if the proceeding is directed against a Bhikkhunî, this is to be done by a Bhikkhunî and not by a Bhikkhu. See Kullavagga X, 6, 3.

17. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhunî ought to be sentenced to recommence penal discipline .... (&c., as in § 7).

18. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhunî who is to be rehabilitated .... (&c., as in § 9).

19. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Saêgha is going to proceed against a Bhikkhunî by the tagganiyakamma .... (&c., as in § 10).

20. 'Or the Saêgha has instituted a proceeding against her .... (&c., as in § 11).

21, 22. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sikkhamânâ is sick (&c., see §§ 2-5).

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sikkhamânâ has violated1 the precepts (in which she is trained). If she sends .... (&c., as in § 3, down to): (saying to yourselves): "I will take care that she may take upon herself the precepts (again)." Within seven days you ought to return.

Nota: 1. This translation of sikkhâ kupitâ hoti is merely conjectural; Buddhaghosa has no note here. Comp. kuppa and akuppa.

23. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sikkhamânâ desires to receive the upasampadâ ordination. If she sends, &c., .... you ought to go (saying to yourselves): "I will take care that she may receive the upasampadâ ordination, or I will proclaim the formula (of ordination before the assembly), or I will help to complete the quorum." Within seven days you ought to return.

24, 25. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sâmaòera is sick (&c., as in §§ 2-5). .. ., a sâmaòera desires to ask concerning Vassa1. If he sends .... (say ing to yourselves): "I will ask him or I will tell it to him." Within seven days you ought to return.

Nota: 1. The technical meaning of vassaê pukkhitum (to ask after Vassa?) is unknown to us.

26. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sâmaòera who de sires to receive the upasampadâ ordination (&c., see § 23).

27, 28. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sâmaòerî is sick (&c., see §§ 24-25).

29. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a sâmaòerî desires to take upon herself the precepts. If she sends. .. . &c., you should go (saying to yourselves): "I will take care that she may take upon herself the precepts." Within seven days you ought to return.'




7


1. At that time the mother of a Bhikkhu was sick. She sent a messenger to her son (saying), 'I am sick; might my son come to me; I long for my son's coming.' Now that Bhikkhu thought: The Blessed One has allowed (a Bhikkhu) to go, if the affair for which he goes can be accomplished within seven days, and if he is sent for, but not if he is not sent for, by a person of any one of the seven classes; (and he has also allowed to go), if the thing he goes for can be accomplished within seven days, even if he is not sent for, and much more if he is sent for, by a person of any one of the five classes. Now my mother is sick; she is not a lay-devotee (upasikâ). What am I, therefore, to do?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

2. 'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to go (even during the rainy season), if the thing you go for can be accomplished within seven days, even if you are not sent for, and much more if you are sent for, by a person of any one of the following seven classes: Bhikkhus, Bhikkhunîs, sikkhamânâs, sâmaòeras, sâmaòerîs, the mother, and the father. I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to go, if the thing you go for can be accomplished within seven days, even if you are not sent for, and much more if you are sent for, by a person of any one of these seven classes. Within seven days you ought to return.

3. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu's mother is sick. If she sends a messenger to her son (saying), " I am sick; might my son come to me; I long for my son's coming (&c., see chap. 6. 2)."

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu's father is sick .... (&c., as in § 3).

5. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu's brother is sick. If he sends a messenger to his brother (saying), "I am sick; might my brother come to me; I long for my brother's coming," he ought to go, O Bhikkhus, if the affair can be accomplished within seven days, and if he sends for him, but not if he-does not send for him. Within seven days he ought to return.

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu's sister is sick .... (&c., see § 5).

7. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a relation of a Bhikkhu is sick. If he sends a messenger to that Bhikkhu (saying), "I am sick; might his reverence come to me". .. . (&c., as in § 5).

8. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a person that used to live with the Bhikkhus1 is sick. If he sends a messenger to the Bhikkhus (saying), "I am sick; might the Bhikkhus come to me ". .. . (&c., as in § 5).'

Nota: 1. Buddhaghosa: bhikkhugatika is a person that dwells in the same Vihâra with the Bhikkhus.




8


At that time a Vihara belonging to the Saêgha went to ruin, A certain upâsaka had a quantity of wood cut in the forest. He sent a messenger to the Bhikkhus (saying), 'If their reverences will fetch that wood, I will give it to them.'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to go out on the Saêgha's business. Within seven days you ought to return.'




End of the first Bhâòavâra about the Vassa residence.




9


1. At that time the Bhikkhus of a certain district in the Kosala country who had entered upon Vassa, were troubled2 by beasts of prey; the beasts carried them off and killed them.

Nota: 2. Compare Gâtaka I, 300.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are troubled by beasts of prey, and the beasts carry them off and kill them: this is to be considered as a case of danger, and they ought to leave that residence. They are not guilty of interruption of Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are infested by snakes; they bite them and kill them. This is to be considered as a case of danger, .... (&c., as in § I down to) .... Vassa.

2. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are troubled by robbers; the robbers plunder them and beat them. This is to be considered .... (&c., as in § 1) .... Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are troubled by demons; the demons enter into them and take their power from them. This is to be considered .... (&c., as in § 1) .. .. Vassa.

3. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the village near which the Bhikkhus have entered upon Vassa, is destroyed by fire; the Bhikkhus suffer from want of food. This is to be considered .... (&c.,as in § 1) .... Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the places of rest of the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are destroyed by fire; the Bhikkhus suffer from having no place of rest. This is to be considered. .. .(&c., as in § 1) .... Vassa.

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the village near which the Bhikkhus have entered upon Vassa, is destroyed by water; the Bhikkhus suffer from want of food, .... (&c., as in § 1) .... Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the places of rest of the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, are de stroyed by water; the Bhikkhus suffer from having no place of rest, .... (&c., as in § 1) .... Vassa.'




10


At that time the village near which the Bhikkhus of a certain district had entered upon Vassa, was transferred to another place through (fear of) robbers.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that you go where the village is.'

The village (people) divided themselves in two parts.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that you go where the greater part is.'

The greater part were unbelieving, unconverted people.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that you go where the believing, converted people are.'




11


1. At that time the Bhikkhus of a certain district in the Kosala country who had entered upon Vassa, could get (there) neither coarse nor fine food sufficiently as required.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, can get neither coarse nor fine food sufficiently as required. This is to be considered as a case of danger, and they ought to leave that residence. They are not guilty of interruption of Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, get food coarse or fine sufficiently as required, but they cannot get sustaining food. This is to be considered .... (&c., as in § 1) .. .. Vassa.

2. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus who have entered upon Vassa, get food coarse or fine sufficiently as required, they get sustaining food, but they cannot get proper medicine. This is to be considered .... (&c., as in § 1). .. . Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, the Bhikkhus .... (&c., as § 1, down to) .... sustaining food, and they can get profitable medicine, but they cannot find suitable laymen to do service to them. This is to be considered. .. . (&c., as in § 1) .... Vassa.

3. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, to a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, a woman makes an offer (in these words): "Come, venerable Sir, I give you gold, or I give you bullion1, or I give you a field, or I give you a site (for a house or a garden), or I give you an ox, or I give you a cow, or I give you a slave, or I give you a female slave, or I give you my daughter as your wife, or I will be your wife, or I get another wife for you." In that case, if the Bhikkhu thinks: "The Blessed One has said that the mind of men is easily changeable; danger might arise to the purity of my life," he ought to go away from that place. He is not guilty of interruption of Vassa.

Nota: 1. See Rh. D.'s 'Ancient Coins and Measures of Ceylon,' p. 5 ('Numismata Orientalia,' vol. i).

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, to a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, a harlot makes an offer, &c., an adult girl makes an offer, &c., a eunuch makes an offer, &c., relations make an offer, &c., kings make an offer, &c., robbers make an offer, &c., rascals make an offer (in these words): "Come, venerable Sir, we give you gold, .... (&c., down to) .... or we give you our daughter as your wife, or we get another wife for you." In that case, .... (&c., as in § 3) .... Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, finds an ownerless treasure. In that case, .... (&c., as in § 3, down to) .... Vassa.

5. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, sees a number of Bhikkhus who strive to cause divisions in the Saêgha. In that case, if that Bhikkhu thinks: "The Blessed One has said that it is a grievous sin to cause divisions in the Saêgha; may no division arise in the Saêgha in my presence," let him go away. He is not guilty of interruption of Vassa.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "A number of Bhikkhus are striving to cause divisions in the Saêgha." In that case, (&c., as in § 5, down to) .... Vassa.

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "In such and such a district a number of Bhikkhus are striving to cause divisions in the Saêgha." If that Bhikkhu thinks: "Those Bhikkhus are friends of mine; I will say to them: 'The Blessed One, my friends, has said that it is a grievous sin to cause divisions in the Saêgha; let not divisions in the Saêgha please you, Sirs;' then they will do what I say, they will obey me and give ear," in that case let him go (to that place). He is not guilty of interruption of Vassa.

7. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "In such and such a district a number of Bhikkhus are striving to cause divisions in the Saêgha." If that Bhikkhu thinks: "Those Bhikkhus are not friends of mine, but their friends are friends of mine; to these I will say, and they will say to their friends: 'The Blessed One,. .. . (&c.,' as in § 6, down to) Vassa.

8. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "In such and such a district divisions in the Saêgha have been caused by a number of Bhikkhus." If that Bhikkhu .... (&c., as in § 6, down to) .... Vassa.

9. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "In such and such a district divisions in the Saêgha have been caused by a number of Bhikkhus." If that Bhikkhu .... (&c., as in § 7) .... Vassa.

10-13. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu who has entered upon Vassa, hears: "In such and such a district a number of Bhikkhunîs strive to cause divisions in the Saêgha .... (&C.1)"'

Nota: 1. See 6-9. Instead of 'A number of Bhikkhus' in these paragraphs, the subject is 'A number of Bhikkhunîs.' Instead of 'Friends' or 'Sirs,' the address is 'Sisters.' In §§ 11, 13 read: 'Those Bhikkhunîs are not friends of mine, but their (female) friends are friends of mine, &c.'




12


1. At that time a Bhikkhu desired to enter upon Vassa in a cattle-pen.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to enter upon Vassa in a cattle-pen.'

The cattle-pen was moved from its place.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to go with the cattle-pen.'

2. At that time a Bhikkhu, when the time for entering upon Vassa approached, desired to go on a journey with a caravan.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to enter upon Vassa in a caravan.'

At that time a Bhikkhu, when the time for enter ing upon Vassa approached, desired to go on a journey in a ship.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to enter upon Vassa in a ship.'

3. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa in a hollow tree. People were annoyed, murmured, and became angry: (These Bhikkhus behave) like goblins1.'

Nota: 1. This must be about the sense of pisâkillika (comp. Kullavagga V, 10, 2; 27, 5), although we are not sure how -illika ought to be explained.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa in a hollow tree. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

4. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa on a branch of a tree. People were annoyed, &c.: (These Bhikkhus behave) like huntsmen.'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa on a branch of a tree. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

5. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa in the open air. When it began to rain, they ran up to the foot of a tree, or to the hollow of a Nimba tree.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa in the open air. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

6. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa without having a place of rest. They suffered from coldness and heat.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa without having a place of rest. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

7. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa in a house for keeping dead bodies in. People were annoyed, &c.: '(These Bhikkhus are) like those who burn corpses.'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa in a house for keeping dead bodies. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

8. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa under a sun-shade. People were annoyed, &c.: 'Like cowherds.'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa under a sun-shade. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'

9. At that time some Bhikkhus entered upon Vassa under an earthenware vessel. People were annoyed, &c.: 'Like Titthiyas.'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, enter upon Vassa under an earthenware vessel. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.'




13


1. At that time the Saêgha at Sâvatthi had made an agreement that nobody should receive the pabbaggâ ordination during the rainy season. A grandson of Visâkhâ Migâramâtâ1 went to the Bhikkhus and asked them for the pabbaggâ ordination. The Bhikkhus said to him: 'The Saêgha, friend, has made an agreement that nobody shall receive the pabbaggâ ordination during the rainy season. Wait, friend, as long as the Bhikkhus keep Vassa; when they have concluded the Vassa residence, they will confer on you the pabbaggâ, ordination.'

Nota: 1. Visâkhâ was the most distinguished among the upâsikâs, and occupied a place among them similar to that which Anâthapiòàika, with whom she is frequently mentioned together, did among the upâsakas. See Dhammapada Aùùhak. p. 78, &c.

When those Bhikkhus had concluded the Vassa residence, they said to the grandson of Visâkhâ Migâramâtâ: 'Come now, friend, you may receive the pabbaggâ ordination. He replied: 'If I had received the pabbaggâ ordination before, reverend Sirs, I should remain (in the religious life), but now, reverend Sirs, I will not receive the pabbaggâ ordination.'

2. Visâkhâ Migâramâtâ was annoyed, murmured, and became angry (saying), 'How can the noble ones make such an agreement that nobody shall receive the pabbaggâ ordination during the rainy season? At what time ought the duties of the Dhamma not to be performed?'

Some Bhikkhus heard Visâkhâ Migâramâtâ, who was annoyed, murmured, and had become angry.

Those Bhikkhus told the thing to the Blessed One.

'Such an agreement, O Bhikkhus, ought not to be made—that nobody shall receive the pabbaggâ ordination during the rainy season. He who makes (an agreement like this), commits a dukkaùa offence.




14


1. At that time the venerable Upananda Sakyaputta had promised to king Pasenadi of Kosala to take up his Vassa residence (with him) at the earlier period1. When he was going to the district (where he had consented to go to), he saw on his way two districts in which there were plenty of robes, and he thought: 'What if I were to keep Vassa in these two districts; thus shall I obtain many robes.' And he kept Vassa in those two districts.

Nota: 1. See chap. 2, 2.

King Pasenadi of Kosala was annoyed, murmured, and became angry (saying), 'How can the noble Upananda Sakyaputta, after he has promised us to take up his Vassa residence (with us), break his word? Has not falsehood been reproved, and abstinence from falsehood been praised by the Blessed One in many ways?'

2. Some Bhikkhus heard king Pasenadi of Kosala, who was annoyed, &c. The moderate Bhikkhus were annoyed, murmured, and became angry (saying), 'How can the venerable Upananda Sakyaputta, after he has promised to king Pasenadi of Kosala, &c.? Has not falsehood .... (&c., as in § 1)?'

3. Those Bhikkhus told the thing to the Blessed One.

In consequence of that, the Blessed One, after having ordered the fraternity of Bhikkhus to assemble, asked the venerable Upananda Sakyaputta: 'Is it true, Upananda, that you have broken your word, having promised to king Pasenadi of Kosala to take up your Vassa residence (with him)?'

'It is true, Lord?'

Then the blessed Buddha rebuked him: 'How can you, O foolish one, break your word, having promised, &c.? Has not falsehood, O foolish one, been reproved, and abstinence from falsehood been praised by me in many ways? This will not do, O foolish one, for converting the unconverted, and for augmenting the number of the converted, but it will result, O foolish one, in the unconverted being repulsed (from the faith) and many of the converted being estranged.'

Having reproved him and delivered a religious discourse, he thus addressed the Bhikkhus:

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised (to a lay-devotee) to take up his Vassa residence (with him) at the earlier period, and when he goes to that district, he sees on his way two districts in which there are plenty of robes, and he thinks: "What if I were to keep Vassa in these two districts; thus shall I obtain many robes;" and he keeps Vassa in those two districts. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa), O Bhikkhus, (at the) earlier period is not valid, and as to his promise he has committed a dukkaùa offence.

5. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised (to a lay-devotee) to take up his Vassa residence (with him) at the earlier period, and when going to that district, he holds Uposatha outside (on the last day of the half month), and on the first day (of the next half month) he goes to the Vihâra, prepares himself a place of rest, gets (water to) drink and food, sweeps the cell, and goes away that same day without having any business. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa) .... (&c., as in § 4, down to) .... offence.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised (&c., as in the preceding case, down to :) and goes away that same day having business. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa). .. . (&c., as in § 4, down to) .... offence.

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised, &c., and having resided there two or three days, he goes away without having any business, &c.; he goes away having business. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa) (&c., as in § 4, down to) offence.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised, &c., and having resided there two or three days, he goes away having a business which can be accomplished within seven days1; he is absent above those seven days. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa) (&c., as in § 4, down to) .... offence.

Nota: 1. See chap. 5 seq.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, &c., he returns within those seven days. This Bhikkhu's (entering upon Vassa), O Bhikkhus, (at the) earlier period is valid, and as to his promise he has committed no offence.

7. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised, &c., and goes away seven days before the Pavâraòâ2 having business. No matter, O Bhikkhus, whether that Bhikkhu comes back to that district or does not come back, this Bhikkhu's entering, &c., is valid, and as to his promise he has committed no offence.

Nota: 2. I. e. before the concluding ceremony of Vassa; see IV, 1,13.

8-10. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised, &c., and having gone to that district, he holds Uposatha there (on the last day of the half month), and on the first day (of the next half month) he goes to the Vihâra, &c.1

Nota: 1. Here follows an exact repetition of all the cases given in §§ 5-7; tne only difference is, that in the former cases it was said: 'When going to that district, he holds Uposatha outside,' instead of which it is said now: 'Having gone to that district, he holds Uposatha there.'

11. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu has promised (to a lay-devotee) to take up his Vassa residence (with him) at the later period, and when going to that district, he holds Uposatha outside, &c.2

Nota: 2. The cases given in §§ 5-10 are repeated here; instead of 'Earlier period,' it is said here 'Later period;' instead of 'Before the Pavâraòâ (§ 7), 'Before the komudî kâtumâsini.' The komudî kâtumâsini is the full moon day in the month Kattika, which is frequently called Kaumuda in the Epic literature; the epithet kâtumâsini refers to the Vedic Kâturmâsya festival, which falls upon that day (Kâtyâyana, Ärautasûtra V, 6, i). For those who entered upon Vassa at the later period (in the Ärâvaòa month), the end of Vassa fell on the Komudî day.




End of the third Khandhaka, which treats of entering upon Vassa.




FOURTH KHANDHAKA



(THE PAVÂRAÒÂ CEREMONY AT THE END OF THE RAINY SEASON, VASSA)





1


1. At that time the blessed Buddha dwelt at Sâvatthi, in the Getavana, the garden of Anâthapiòàika. At that time a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, entered upon Vassa in a certain district of the Kosala country. Now those Bhikkhus thought: 'What shall we do in order that we may keep Vassa well, in unity, and in concord, and without quarrel, and that we may not suffer from want of food?'

2. Then those Bhikkhus thought: 'If we do not speak to or converse with each other, if he who comes back first from the village, from his alms-pilgrimage, prepares seats, gets water for washing the feet, a foot-stool, and a towel1, cleans the slop-basin and gets it ready, and puts there (water to) drink and food,—

Nota: 1. See the note on I, 6, 11.

3. 'And if he who comes back last from the village, from his alms-pilgrimage, eats, if there is any food left (from the dinner of the other Bhikkhus) and if he desires to do so; and if he does not desire (to eat), throws it away at a place free from grass, or pours it away into water in which no living things are; puts away the water for washing the feet, the foot-stool, and the towel1; cleans the slop-basin and puts it away, puts the water and the food away, and sweeps the dining-room,—

Nota: 1. See the note on I, 6, 11.

4. 'And if he who sees a water-pot, or a bowl for food, or a vessel for evacuations, empty and void, puts it (into its proper place), and if he is not able to do so single-handed, calls some one else and puts it away with their united effort1 without uttering a word on that account,—thus shall we keep Vassa well, in unity, and in concord, and without quarrel, and not suffer from want of food2.'

Nota: 1. We are not quite sure of the meaning of the compounds hattha-vikârena and hattha-vilaôghakena. Buddhaghosa says merely hatthavilaôghakenâ 'ti hatthukkhepakena.
Nota: 2. For this whole passage, compare Kullavagga VIII, 5, 3. The single actions which these Bhikkhus do, are quite correct, except that they keep silence during the whole time of Vassa, and especially at the end of it, for which time Buddha, on this occasion, prescribes the Pavâraòâ ceremony.

5-7. And those Bhikkhus did not speak to or converse with each other. He who came back from the village from his alms-pilgrimage first, prepared seats (&c., as above, § 4, down to) .... without uttering a word on that account.

8. Now it is the custom of the Bhikkhus who have finished their Vassa residence, to go to see the Blessed One. Thus those Bhikkhus, when they had finished their Vassa residence, and when the three months (of Vassa) had elapsed, set their places of rest in order, took their alms-bowls and robes, and went on their way to Sâvatthi. Wandering from place to place, they came to Sâvatthi, to the Getavanaj, the garden of Anâthapiòàika, to the Blessed One; having approached the Blessed One and respectfully saluted him, they sat down near him.

9. Now it is the custom of the blessed Buddhas to exchange greeting with incoming Bhikkhus. And the Blessed One said to those Bhikkhus: 'Do things go well with you, O Bhikkhus? Do you get enough to support yourselves with? Have you kept Vassa well, in unity, and in concord, and without quarrel? and have you not suffered from want of food?'

'Things go tolerably well with us, Lord; we get enough, Lord, wherewith to support ourselves; we have kept Vassa well, in unity, in concord, and without quarrel; and have not suffered from want of food.'

10. The Tathâgatas sometimes ask about what they know; sometimes they do not ask about what they know. They understand the right time when to ask, and they understand the right time when not to ask. The Tathâgatas put questions full of sense, not void of sense; to what is void of sense the bridge is pulled down for the Tathâgatas. For two purposes the blessed Buddhas put questions to the Bhikkhus, when they intend to preach the doctrine, or when they intend to institute a rule of conduct to their disciples.

11. And the Blessed One said to those Bhikkhus: In what way, O Bhikkhus, have you kept Vassa well, in unity, and in concord, and without quarrel, and not suffered from want of food?'

'We have entered upon Vassa, Lord, a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, in a certain district of the Kosala country. Now, Lord, we thought: "What shall we do (&c., as in § 1)?" Then we thought, Lord: "If we do not speak (&c., as in §§ 2-4)." Thus, Lord, we did not speak to or converse with each other (&c., down to :) without uttering a word on that account. In that way, Lord, we have kept Vassa well, in unity, and in concord, and without quarrel; and have not suffered from want of food.'

12. Then the Blessed One thus addressed the Bhikkhus: Indeed, O Bhikkhus, these foolish men who profess to have kept Vassa well, have kept it badly; indeed, O Bhikkhus, these foolish men who profess to have kept Vassa well, have kept it like a herd of cattle; indeed .... have kept it like a herd of rams; indeed .... have kept it like a company of indolent people. How can these foolish persons, O Bhikkhus, take upon themselves the vow of silence, as the Titthiyas do?

13. 'This will not do, O Bhikkhus, for converting the unconverted (&c., as in Book III, chapter 14, § 3).

And when he had rebuked them and delivered a religious discourse, he thus addressed the Bhikkhus:

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, take upon himself the vow of silence, as the Titthiyas do. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that the Bhikkhus, when they have finished their Vassa residence, hold Pavâraòâ with each other1 in these three ways: by what has been seen, or by what has been heard, or by what is suspected. Hence it will result that you live in accord with each other, that you atone for the offences (you have committed), and that you keep the rules of discipline before your eyes.

Nota: 1. Literally, invite each other; i. e. every Bhikkhu present invites his companions to tell him if they believe him guilty of an offence, having seen that offence, or having heard of it, or suspecting it.

14. 'And you ought, O Bhikkhus, to hold Pavâraòâ in this way:

'Let a learned, competent Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before the Saêgha: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. To-day is the Pavâraòâ day. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ."

'Then let the senior Bhikkhu adjust his upper robe so as to cover one shoulder, sit down squatting, raise his joined hands, and say: "I pronounce my Pavâraòâ, friends, before the Saêgha, by what has been seen, or by what has been heard, or by what is suspected1; may you speak to me, Sirs, out of compassion towards me; if I see (an offence), I will atone for it. And for the second time, &c. And for the third time I pronounce my Pavâraòâ.... (&c., down to) .... if I see (an offence), I will atone for it."

Nota: 1. I. e. I invite the Saêgha to charge me with any offence they think me guilty of, which they have seen, or heard of, or which they suspect.

Then let (each) younger Bhikkhu adjust his upper robe .... (&c.)2

Nota: 2. As in the preceding sentence, except that the younger Bhikkhus do not address the Saêgha, 'Friends, but, Reverend Sirs.'




2


1. At that time the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus, while the senior Bhikkhus were crouching down and were performing their Pavâraòâ, remained on their seats. The moderate Bhikkhus were annoyed, murmured, and became angry: How can the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus remain on their seats, while the senior Bhikkhus crouch down, and perform their Pavâraòâ?'

Those Bhikkhus told the thing to the Blessed One.

'Is it true, O Bhikkhus, that the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus, &c.?'

'It is true, O Lord.'

Then the blessed Buddha rebuked them: 'How can these foolish men, O Bhikkhus, remain on their seats (&c., as above)? This will not do, O Bhikkhus, for converting the unconverted (&c., as in chap, 1, § 13).'

Having rebuked them and delivered a religious discourse, he thus addressed the Bhikkhus: 'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, remain on his seat, while the senior Bhikkhus crouch down, and perform their Pavâraòâ. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that all of you crouch down while Pavâraòâ is being performed.'

2. At that time a certain Bhikkhu weak from age, who waited crouching till all had finished their Pavâraòâ, fell down fainting.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that (every Bhikkhu) crouches down the whole while till he has performed his Pavâraòâ, and sits down on his seat when he has performed it.'




3


1. Now the Bhikkhus thought: 'How many Pavâraòâ (days) are there?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'There are the two following Pavâraòâ (days), O Bhikkhus: the fourteenth and the fifteenth (of the half month)1; these are the two Pavâraòâ (days), O Bhikkhus.'

Nota: 1 Comp. II, 14, i, and the note on II, 34, i.

2. Now the Bhikkhus thought: 'How many Pavâraòâ services are there?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'There are the four following Pavâraòâ services, O Bhikkhus, &c.2'

Nota: 2. This passage is exactly identical with II, 14, 2. 3, replacing Uposatha service by Pavâraòâ service.'

3. Then the Blessed One thus addressed the Bhikkhus: Assemble, O Bhikkhus, the Saêgha will hold Pavâraòâ. When he had spoken thus, a certain Bhikkhu said to the Blessed One: 'There is a sick Bhikkhu, Lord, who is not present.'

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that a sick Bhikkhu shall declare (lit. give) his Pavâraòâ. And let him declare it, O Bhikkhus, in this way: Let that sick Bhikkhu go to some Bhikkhu, adjust his upper robe so as to cover one shoulder, sit down squatting, raise his joined hands, and say: "I declare my Pavâraòâ, take my Pavâraòâ, perform the Pavâraòâ. for me." If he expresses this by gesture, or by word, or by gesture and word, the Pavâraòâ has been declared. If he does not express this by gesture, &c., the Pavâraòâ has not been declared.

4-5. 'If (the sick Bhikkhu) succeeds in doing so, well and good. If he does not succeed, let them take that sick Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, on his bed or his chair to the assembly, &c.3

Nota: 3. This passage is a repetition of II, 22, 2-4, the words, 'Hold Uposatha,' 'Declare the Pârisuddhi,' &c., being replaced respectively by 'Hold Pavâraòâ', Declare the Pavâraòâ,' &c.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that on the day of Pavâraòâ he who declares his Pavâraòâ, is to declare also his consent1 (to acts to be performed eventually by the Order), for (both declarations) are required for the Saêgha (and for the validity of its acts)2'

Nota: 1. See II, 23.
Nota: 2. Comp. the finishing clause of II, 23.




4


At that time relations of a certain Bhikkhu kept him back on the day of Pavâraòâ, &c.3

Nota: 3. This is a repetition of II, 24, but instead of Uposatha and Pârisuddhi read Pavâraòâ.




5

1. At that time five Bhikkhus dwelt in a certain district (or, in a certain residence of Bhikkhus) on the day of Pavâraòâ.

Now these Bhikkhus thought: 'The Blessed One has prescribed the holding of Pavâraòâ by the Saêgha, and we are (only) five persons4. Well, how are we to hold Pavâraòâ?'

Nota: 4. As a general rule five Bhikkhus were sufficient to form the quorum; but for the performance of several among the official acts of the Order the presence of more than five members was required; see IX, 4, i seq.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that five Bhikkhus should hold Pavâraòâ in a (regular) chapter5.'

Nota: 5 See IX, 4, i.

2. At that time four Bhikkhus dwelt in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ. Now these Bhikkhus thought: 'The Blessed One has prescribed that five Bhikkhus shall hold Pavâraòâ in a (regular) chapter, and we are (only) four persons. Well, how are we to hold Pavâraòâ?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that four Bhikkhus should hold Pavâraòâ with each other.

3. 'And let them hold Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, in this way: Let a learned, competent Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before those Bhikkhus; "Hear me, Sirs. To-day is Pavâraòâ day. If you are ready, Sirs, let us hold Pavâraòâ with each other."

'Then let the senior Bhikkhu adjust his upper robe, &c., and say to those Bhikkhus: "I pronounce my Pavâraòâ, friends, before you, by what has been seen, or by what has been heard, or by what is suspected; may you speak to me, Sirs, out of compassion towards me; if I see (an offence), I will atone for it. And for the second time, &c.; and for the third time, &c."

'Then let each younger Bhikkhu, &c.'

4. At that time three Bhikkhus dwelt in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ. Now these Bhikkhus thought: 'The Blessed One has prescribed that five Bhikkhus shall hold Pavâraòâ in a (regular) chapter, that four Bhikkhus shall hold Pavâraòâ with each other, and we are (only) three persons. Well, how are we to hold Pavâraòâ?'

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that three Bhikkhus should hold Pavâraòâ with each other. And let them hold Pavâraòâ (&c., see § 3).'

5. At that time two Bhikkhus dwelt in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ. Now these Bhikkhus thought: 'The Blessed One has prescribed that five Bhikkhus, &c., that four Bhikkhus, &c., that three Bhikkhus, &c., and we are (only) two persons. Well, how are we to hold Pavâraòâ?'

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that two Bhikkhus should hold Pavâraòâ with each other.

6. 'And let them hold Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, in this way: Let the senior Bhikkhu adjust his upper robe, &c., and say to the junior Bhikkhu: "I pronounce my Pavâraòâ, friend, &c,"

'Then let the junior Bhikkhu, &c.'

7. At that time there dwelt a single Bhikkhu in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ. Now this Bhikkhu thought: 'The Blessed One has prescribed that five Bhikkhus, &c., &c., and I am only one person. Well, how am I to hold Pavâraòâ?'

8. 'In case there dwell, O Bhikkhus, in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ, a single Bhikkhu: Let that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, sweep the place which the Bhikkhus use to frequent,—the refectory, or hall, or place at the foot of a tree; let him (then) provide water and food, prepare seats, put a lamp there, and sit down. If other Bhikkhus come, let him hold Pavâraòâ with them; if they do not come, let him fix his mind upon the thought: "To-day is my Pavâraòâ." If he does not fix his mind upon this thought, he commits a dukkaùa offence.

9. 'Now, O Bhikkhus, where five Bhikkhus dwell (together), they must not convey the Pavâraòâ1 of one (to their assembly) and hold Pavâraòâ by four (as) in a (regular) chapter. If they do, they commit a dukkaùa offence.

Nota: 1. See chap. 3, § 3. Compare II, chap. 22, and chap. 26, § 10.

'Now, O Bhikkhus, where four Bhikkhus dwell (together), they must not convey the Pavâraòâ of one (to their assembly) and hold Pavâraòâ with each other by three. If they do, they commit a dukkaùa offence.

'Now, O Bhikkhus, where three Bhikkhus (&c., as in the last clause).

'Now, O Bhikkhus, where two Bhikkhus dwell, one of them must not convey the Pavâraòâ of the other one, and fix (only) his thoughts (upon the Pavâraòâ). If he does, he commits a dukkaùa offence.'




6


1. At that time a certain Bhikkhu was guilty of an offence on the day of Pavâraòâ. Now this Bhikkhu thought: The Blessed One has prescribed: "Pavâraòâ is not to be held by a Bhikkhu who is guilty of an offence1." Now I am guilty of an offence. What am I to do?'

Nota: 1. See chap. 16, i.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'In case, O Bhikkhus, a certain Bhikkhu be guilty of an offence on the day of Pavâraòâ (&c., as in II, 27. i, 2, down to :) "When I shall feel no doubt, then I will atone for that offence." Having spoken thus, let him hold Pavâraòâ. But in no case must there any hindrance arise to holding Pavâraòâ from such a cause.'

2-3. At that time a certain Bhikkhu remembered an offence, while Pavâraòâ was being held (&c., see II, 27. 4-8).




End of the first Bhâòavâra.




7-13


7. i. At that time there assembled in a certain residence (or district) on the day of Pavâraòâ a number of resident Bhikkhus, five or more. They did not know that there were other resident Bhikkhus absent. Intending to act according to Dhamma and Vinaya, thinking themselves to be complete while (really) incomplete, they held Pavâraòâ. While they were holding Pavâraòâ, other resident Bhikkhus, a greater number (than the first ones), arrived.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

2. 'In case there assemble, O Bhikkhus, in a certain residence on the day of Pavâraòâ (&c., as in i, down to) .... they hold Pavâraòâ. While they are holding Pavâraòâ, other resident Bhikkhus, a greater number, arrive. Let (all) those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ again; they who have held Pavâraòâ, are free from guilt.

3. 'In case there assemble, &c While they are holding Pavâraòâ, other resident Bhikkhus, exactly the same number (as the first ones), arrive. Those who have held Pavâraòâ, have held it correctly; let the other ones hold Pavâraòâ; they who have held Pavâraòâ, are free from guilt.'

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1

Nota: 1. The following paragraphs and chapters exactly follow the course indicated by II, 28-35. The alterations to be made are obvious and sufficiently indicated by §§ 1-3; instead of, 'Let tnem proclaim their Pârisuddhi' (II, 28, 4, &c.), read here, 'Let them pronounce their Pavâraòâ'




14


1-3. 'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a Bhikkhuni,. .. , (&C.1)

Nota: 1. See II, 36, 1-3.

4. 'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ by (accepting) the Pavâraòâ declaration of a parivasika2, except if the assembly has not yet risen (at the time when the Pavâraòâ is declared). And let no one, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ on another day than the Pavâraòâ day, except for the sake of (preserving) concord among the Saêgha3.'

Nota: 2. Comp. II, 36, 4, with the note.
Nota: 3. See, for instance, the cases in chap. 17. Buddhaghosa's explanation is different; he says: Concord among the Saêgha is to be understood of such cases as that of Kosambî. It is said in the account of the schism of Kosambî that, if concord has been re-established, the reconciled parties hold Uposatha together (X, 5, 14; comp. II, 36, 4); Buddhaghosa apparently extends this to holding Pavâraòâ also.




15


1. At that time a certain residence (of Bhikkhus) in the Kosala country was menaced on the day of Pavâraòâ by savage people. The Bhikkhus were not able to perform Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to perform Pavâraòâ with the twofold formula1.'

Nota: 1. This means apparently that the Bhikkhus were not obliged to pronounce the formula of Pavâraòâ (chap, i, 14) thrice, but twice or once respectively.

The danger from savage people became still more urgent. The Bhikkhus were not able to perform Pavâraòâ with the twofold formula.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow you, O Bhikkhus, to perform Pavâraòâ with the onefold formula1.

Nota: 1. This means apparently that the Bhikkhus were not obliged to pronounce the formula of Pavâraòâ (chap, i, 14) thrice, but twice or once respectively.

The danger from savage people became still more urgent. The Bhikkhus were not able to perform Pavâraòâ with the onefold formula.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I allow, O Bhikkhus, that all the Bhikkhus who have keptVassa together, perform Pavâraòâ (by one common declaration).'

2. At that time in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ the greater part of the night had passed away while (lay-) people were offering gifts (to the Bhikkhus). Now the Bhikkhus thought: The greater part of the night has passed away while the people were offering gifts. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula, it will not have finished the Pavâraòâ when day breaks. Well, what are we to do?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

3. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ the greater part of the night has passed away while people were offering gifts (to the Bhikkhus). Now if those Bhikkhus think: "The greater part (&c., down to :) when day breaks," let a learned, competent Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before the Saêgha: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. While people were offering gifts, the greater part of the night has passed away. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula, it will not have finished the Pavâraòâ when day breaks. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ with the twofold formula, or with the onefold formula, or by common declaration of all the Bhikkhus who have kept Vassa together."

4. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ the greater part of the night has passed away while the Bhikkhus were in confusion: the Bhikkhus were reciting the Dhamma, those versed in the Suttantas were propounding the Suttantas, those versed in the Vinaya were discussing the Vinaya, the Dhamma preachers were talking about the Dhamma. Now if those Bhikkhus think: "The greater part of the night has passed away while the Bhikkhus were in confusion. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula, it will not have finished the Pavâraòâ when day breaks," let a learned, competent Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before the Saêgha: "Let the Saêgha, &c. The greater part of the night has passed away while the Bhikkhus were in confusion. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ (&c. as in § 3)."'

5. At that time in a certain district in the Kosala country a great assembly of Bhikkhus had come together on the day of Pavâraòâ, and there was but a small place protected from rain, and a great cloud was in the sky. Now the Bhikkhus thought: 'A great assembly of Bhikkhus has come together here, and there is but a small place protected from rain, and a great cloud is in the sky. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula, it will not have finished the Pavâraòâ when this cloud will begin to rain. Well, what are we to do?' They told this thing to the Blessed One.

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, in a certain district a great assembly of Bhikkhus has come together on the day of Pavâraòâ, and there is but a small place protected from rain, and a great cloud is in the sky. Now if those Bhikkhus think .... (&c., as in § 3 to the end).

7. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, in a certain district on the day of Pavâraòâ danger arises from kings, danger from robbers, danger from fire, danger from water, danger from human beings, danger from non-human beings, danger from beasts of prey, danger from creeping things, danger of life, danger against chastity. Now if those Bhikkhus think: "Here is danger for our chastity. If the Saêgha performs Pavâraòâ with the threefold formula, it will not have finished the Pavâraòâ when this danger for chastity will arise," let a learned, competent Bhikkhu. .. .; (&c., as in § 3 to the end).




16


1. At that time the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus held Pavâraòâ being guilty of an offence.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ who is guilty of an offence. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that you ask a Bhikkhu who holds Pavâraòâ being guilty of an offence, for his leave1 and reprove him for that offence.'

Nota: 1. Comp. II, 16, i.

2. At that time the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus, when asked for leave, were not willing to give leave (to Bhikkhus who were going to reprove them for an offence).

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that you inhibit the Pavâraòâ of a Bhikkhu who does not give leave. And you ought to inhibit it, O Bhikkhus, in this way: Let (a Bhikkhu) say on the day of Pavâraòâ, on the fourteenth or on the fifteenth day (of the half month), in presence of that person, before the assembled Saêgha: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. Such and such a person is guilty of an offence; I inhibit his Pavâraòâ; Pavâraòâ must not be held in his presence." Thus his Pavâraòâ is inhibited.'

3. At that time the Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus, who thought: Otherwise good Bhikkhus might inhibit our Pavâraòâ/ themselves inhibited beforehand, without object and reason, the Pavâraòâ of pure Bhikkhus who had committed no offence, and they also inhibited the Pavâraòâ of Bhikkhus who had already performed their Pavâraòâ.

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

'Let no one, O Bhikkhus, inhibit, without object and reason, the Pavâraòâ of pure Bhikkhus who have committed no offence. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. And further, O Bhikkhus, let no one inhibit the Pavâraòâ of Bhikkhus who have already performed their Pavâraòâ. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.

4. 'And thus, O Bhikkhus, (you may discern whether) the Pavâraòâ is (duly) inhibited or not inhibited.

'In what cases is the Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, not inhibited? When Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, is pronounced, declared, and finished with the threefold formula, and if (a Bhikkhu then) inhibits the Pavâraòâ (of another Bhikkhu), the Pavâraòâ is not inhibited. When Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, is pronounced, declared, and finished with the twofold formula, with the onefold formula, by common declaration of all Bhikkhus who have kept Vassa together, and if (a Bhikkhu then) inhibits, .... (&c., as before). In these cases, O Bhikkhus, the Pavâraòâ is not inhibited.

5. 'And in what cases, O Bhikkhus, is the Pavâraòâ inhibited? When Pavâraòâ, O Bhikkhus, is pronounced, declared, but not finished1 with the threefold formula, and if (a Bhikkhu then) inhibits the Pavâraòâ (of another Bhikkhu), the Pavâraòâ is inhibited, .... (&c.2). In these cases, O Bhikkhus, the Pavâraòâ is inhibited.

Nota: 1. Correct in the Pâli text pariyositâya into apariyositâya.
Nota: 2. The paragraph is repeated with the phrases, 'With the twofold formula,' 'with the onefold formula,' and 'by common declaration of all the Bhikkhus who have kept Vassa together,' respectively, instead of 'with the threefold formula.'

6. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, one Bhikkhu, on the day of Pavâraòâ, inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another Bhikkhu: then if the other Bhikkhus know with regard to that (inhibiting) Bhikkhu: "This venerable brother is not of a pure conduct in his deeds, nor in his words, nor as regards his means of livelihood, he is ignorant, unlearned, unable to give explanation when he is questioned," (let them say to him): "Nay, friend, let not quarrel arise, nor strife, nor discord, nor dispute," and having thus put him to silence, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ.

7-9. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, &C,1

Nota: 1. As in § 6. But instead of 'Not of a pure conduct in his deeds, nor in his words, nor as regards his means of livelihood,' read respectively, Of a pure conduct in his deeds, but not in his words, nor as regards his means of livelihood' (§ 7); 'Of a pure conduct in his deeds and in his words, but not with regard to his means of livelihood' (§ 8); 'Of a pure conduct in his deeds and in his words and with regard to his means of livelihood' (§ 9).

10. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, one Bhikkhu on the day of Pavâraòâ inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another Bhikkhu: then if the other Bhikkhus know with regard to that (inhibiting) Bhikkhu: "This venerable brother is of a pure conduct in his deeds and in his words and with regard to his means of livelihood, he is clever, learned, and able to give explanation when he is questioned," let them say to him: "If you inhibit, friend, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu, on what account do you inhibit it, on account of a moral transgression, or on account of a transgression against the rules of conduct, or on account of heresy?"

11. 'If he replies: "I inhibit it on account of a moral transgression, I inhibit it on account of a transgression against the rules of conduct, I inhibit it on account of heresy," let them say to him: "Well, do you know, Sir, what a moral transgression is, what a transgression against the rules of conduct is, what heresy is?" If he replies, "I know, friends, what a moral transgression is, &c.," let them say to him: "And what is, friend, a moral transgression, &c.?"

12. 'If he replies: "The four pârâgika offences and the thirteen Saêghâdisesa offences are the moral transgressions; thullakkaya offences, pâkittiya offences, pâùidesanîya offences, dukkaùa offences, and wicked language are the transgressions against the rules of conduct; false doctrine and .... doctrine1 are heresy," let them say to him: "If you inhibit, friend, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu, do you inhibit it on account of what you have seen, or of what you have heard, or of what you suspect?"

Nota: 1. The meaning of antaggâhikâ diùùhi (Sanskrit ântargrahikâ dèishùi? ântagrahikâ dèishùi?) is unknown to us; Buddhaghosa gives no explanation. Perhaps it may mean doctrine partly false and partly correct (eclectic).

13. 'If he replies: "I inhibit it on account of what I have seen, or on account of what I have heard, or on account of what I suspect," let them say to him: "If you inhibit, friend, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what you have seen, what have you seen? What is it that you have seen? When have you seen it? Where have you seen it? Have you seen him committing a pârâgika offence? Have you seen him committing a saêghâdisesa offence? Have you seen him committing a thullakkaya offence, a pâkittiya offence, a pâùidesanîya offence, a dukkaùa offence, or making himself guilty of wicked language? And where were you? And where was this Bhikkhu? And what did you do? And what did this Bhikkhu do?"

14. 'If he then replies: "I do not inhibit, friends, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what I have seen, but I inhibit it on account of what I have heard," let them say to him: "If you inhibit, friend, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what you have heard, what have you heard? What is it that you have heard? When have you heard it? Where have you heard it? Have you heard that he has committed a pârâgika offence, .... (&c., down to) .... or that he has made himself guilty of wicked language? Have you heard it from a Bhikkhu? Have you heard it from a Bhikkhunî? Have you heard it from a sikkhamânâ, from a sâmaòera, from a sâmaòerî, from an upâsaka, from an upasikâ, from kings, from royal officers, from Titthiyas, from Titthiya disciples?"

15. 'If he then replies: "I do not inhibit, friends, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what I have heard, but I inhibit it on account of what I suspect," let them say to him: "If you inhibit, friend, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what you suspect, what do you suspect? What is it that you suspect? When do you suspect it? Where do you suspect it? Do you suspect that he has committed a pârâgika offence, .... (&c., down to) .... wicked language? Does your suspicion come from what you have heard from a Bhikkhu, .... (&c., down to) .... from Titthiya disciples?"

16. 'If he then replies: "I do not inhibit, friends, the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu on account of what I suspect; I do not know the reason why I inhibit the Pavâraòâ of this Bhikkhu," and if that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who reproves (the other one), being questioned by intelligent fellow Bhikkhus, is not able to convince their minds, you are right in saying that in such case the Bhikkhu who has been reproved is blameless. But if that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who reproves (the other one), being questioned by intelligent fellow Bhikkhus, is able to convince their minds, you are right in saying that in such case the Bhikkhu who has been reproved is blamable.

17. 'If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who reproves (another one), admits that he has charged him unfoundedly with a pârâgika offence, let the Saêgha enter upon the saêghâdisesa proceedings1 (against the accuser) and then hold Pavâraòâ.

Nota: 1. See the 8th Saêghâdisesa rule.

'If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who reproves (an other one), admits that he has charged him un foundedly with a saêghâdisesa offence, let the Saêgha treat (the accuser) according to the law2 and then hold Pavâraòâ.

Nota: 2. See the 76th Pâkittiya rule.

'If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who reproves (another one), admits that he has charged him unfoundedly with a thullakkaya offence, or with a pâkittiya offence, or with a pâùidesanîya offence, or with a dukkaùa offence, or with having used wicked language, let the Saêgha treat (the accuser) according to the law3 and then hold Pavâraòâ.

Nota: 3. According to Buddhaghosa, the Bhikkhu who brings such an unfounded charge against a fellow Bhikkhu, is guilty of a dukkaùa offence.

18. 'If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, who has been reproved, admits that he has committed a pârâgika offence, let the Saêgha expel him and then hold Pavâraòâ.

'If that Bhikkhu, &c., admits that he has committed a saêghâdisesa offence, let the Saêgha enter upon the saêghâdisesa proceedings (against him) and then hold Pavâraòâ.

'If that Bhikkhu, &c., admits that he has com mitted a thullakkaya offence, or a pâkittiya offence, .... (&c., down to) .... wicked language, let the Saêgha treat him according to the law and then hold Pavâraòâ.

19. In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu on the day of Pavâraòâ is guilty of a thullakkaya offence. Some Bhikkhus believe that it is a thullakkaya offence, other Bhikkhus believe that it is a saêghâdisesa offence. In that case, O Bhikkhus, let those Bhikkhus who take it for a thullakkaya offence, take that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, aside, treat him according to the law, go back to the Saêgha, and say: "The offence, friends, which this Bhikkhu has committed, he has atoned for according to the law. If the Saêgha's is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ."

20. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu on the day of Pavâraòâ is guilty of a thullakkaya offence. Some Bhikkhus believe that it is a thullakkaya offence, other Bhikkhus believe that it is a pâkittiya offence. Some Bhikkhus believe that It" is a thullakkaya offence, other Bhikkhus believe that it is a pâùidesanîya offence; a thullakkaya offence; a dukkaùa offence; a thullakkaya offence, an offence by wicked language. In that case (&c., as in § 19, down to the end).

21. 22. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu on the day of Pavâraòâ is guilty of a pâkittiya offence, of a pâùidesanîya offence, of a dukkaùa offence, of an offence by wicked language. Some Bhikkhus believe that it is an offence by wicked language, other Bhikkhus believe that it is a Saêghâdisesa offence, &c. Some Bhikkhus believe that it is an offence by wicked language, other Bhikkhus believe that it is a dukkaùa offence. In that case, O Bhikkhus, let those Bhikkhus who take it for an offence by wicked language, take that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, aside (&c., see § 19).

23. 'If, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu speaks thus before the assembly on the day of Pavâraòâ: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. Here this deed is known (to me), but not the (guilty) person. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ excluding this deed/ (the Bhikkhus) ought to reply: "The Blessed One, friend, has prescribed that they who hold Pavâraòâ, ought to be pure. If a deed is known, but not the (guilty) person, report it (to us) now."

24. 'If, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu speaks thus before the assembly on the day of Pavâraòâ: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. Here a person is known (to me as guilty), but not his deed. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ excluding this person," (the Bhikkhus) ought to reply: "The Blessed One, friend, has prescribed that they who hold Pavâraòâ, ought to be complete. If a person is known to you (as guilty), but not his deed, report it (to us) now."

25. 'If, O Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu speaks thus before the assembly on the day of Pavâraòâ: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. Here a deed is known (to me) as well as the (guilty) person. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ excluding this deed and this person," (the Bhikkhus) ought to reply: "The Blessed One, friend, has prescribed that they who hold Pavâraòâ, ought to be pure as well as complete. If the deed and the (guilty) person are known to you, report it (to us) now."

26. 'If, O Bhikkhus, a deed becomes known before the Pavâraòâ, and the (guilty) person afterwards (i. e. after the Pavâraòâ), it is right to bring it forward (then)1.

Nota: 1. Because it had not been possible to decide the matter at the Pavâraòâ (Buddhaghosa).

'If, O Bhikkhus, the (guilty) person becomes known before the Pavâraòâ, and his deed afterwards, it is right to bring it forward (then).

'If, O Bhikkhus, the deed as well as the (guilty) person becomes known before the Pavâraòâ, and if (a Bhikkhu) raises up that matter again after the Pavâraòâ, he makes himself guilty of a pâkittiya offence for raising up (a matter that has been settled)2.

Nota: 2. See the 63rd Pâkittiya rule.




17


1. At that time a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, entered upon Vassa in a certain district of the Kosala country. In their neighbourhood other Bhikkhus, litigious, contentious, quarrelsome, disputatious persons, who used to raise questions before the Saêgha, entered upon Vassa with the intention of inhibiting, on the Pavâraòâ day, the Pavâraòâ of those Bhikkhus when they should have finished their Vassa residence. Now those Bhikkhus heard: In our neighbourhood other Bhikkhus, &c. Well, what are we to do?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

2. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, enter upon Vassa in a certain district. In their neighbourhood other Bhikkhus, .... (&c., § 1). I prescribe, O Bhikkhus, that those Bhikkhus hold Uposatha twice or thrice on the fourteenth day (of the half-month)1 in order that they may be able to hold Pavâraòâ before those (other) Bhikkhus. If those litigious, contentious, .... (&c., § 1) Bhikkhus approach that district, let the resident Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, quickly assemble and hold Pavâraòâ; having held Pavâraòâ, let them say to them: "We have held our Pavâraòâ, friends; do you do, Sirs, as you think fit."

Nota: 1. In this way, when the inimical Bhikkhus are arriving about the time of Pavâraòâ, the resident Bhikkhus count the day which is the thirteenth or fourteenth to the other Bhikkhus, as the fifteenth, and thus they are enabled to finish their Pavâraòâ before they can be prevented.

3. 'If those litigious,. . ,. (&c., § 1) Bhikkhus come to that residence unexpectedly, let the resident Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, prepare seats (for them), get water for the washing of their feet, foot-stools, and towels2, then let them go to meet them, take their bowls and their robes, and offer them (water) to drink; having thus looked after those Bhikkhus, let them go outside the boundary and hold Pavâraòâ; having held Pavâraòâ, let them say: "We have held our Pavâraòâ, friends, .do you do, Sirs, as you think fit."

Nota: 2. See I, 6, ii.

4. 'If they succeed in this way, well and good; if they do not succeed, let a learned, competent, resident Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before the resident Bhikkhus: "Let the resident Bhikkhus hear me, Sirs. If you are ready, Sirs, let us now hold Uposatha and recite the Pâtimokkha, and let us hold Pavâraòâ on the next new-moon day." If, O Bhikkhus, the litigious, .... (&c., § 1) Bhikkhus say to those Bhikkhus: "Well, friends, hold Pavâraòâ with us now," let them reply: "You are not masters, friends, of our Pavâraòâ; we will not hold Pavâraòâ now."

5. 'If, O Bhikkhus, those litigious, .... (&c., § 1) Bhikkhus stay there till that new-moon day, let a learned, competent, resident Bhikkhu,. .. .1

Nota: 1. As in § 4, down to the end of the paragraph; instead of, 'On the next new-moon day,' it is to be read here, 'On the next full-moon day.'

6. 'If, O Bhikkhus, those litigious, .... (&c., § 1) Bhikkhus stay there still till that full-moon day, those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, ought to hold Pavâraòâ all of them, no matter whether they like it or not, on the next full-moon day, on the day of the komudî kâtumâsinî2.

Nota: 2. See the note on III, 14, 11.

7. 'If those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ, and a sick Bhikkhu inhibits the Pavâraòâ of a healthy Bhikkhu, let them say (to the inhibiting Bhikkhu): "You are sick, Sir, and the Blessed One has said that a sick person cannot endure being questioned. Wait, friend, until you have recovered; having recovered, you may reprove him, if you like." If they speak to him thus, and he reproves (that Bhikkhu) notwithstanding, he makes himself guilty of the pâkittiya offence of disregard1.

Nota: 1. See the 54th Pâkittiya rule.

8. 'If those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ, and a healthy Bhikkhu inhibits the Pavâraòâ of a sick Bhikkhu, let them say (to the inhibiting Bhikkhu): "This Bhikkhu is sick, friend, and the Blessed One has said that a sick person cannot endure being questioned. Wait, friend, until this Bhikkhu has recovered; when he has recovered you may reprove him, if you like." If they speak to him thus, .... (&c., as in § 7).

9. 'If those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ, and a sick Bhikkhu inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another sick Bhikkhu, let them say (to the inhibiting Bhikkhu): "You are sick, Sirs, and the Blessed One has said that a sick person cannot endure being questioned. Wait, friend, until you have recovered; when he has recovered2 you may reprove him, if you like." If they speak to him thus, .... (&c., as in § 7).

Nota: 2. Probably we should read in the Pâli text, 'ârogo ârogaê âkaôkhamâno kodessasîti.' Then the translation would be: 'When you have recovered and he has recovered, &c.'

10. 'If those Bhikkhus, O Bhikkhus, hold Pavâraòâ, and a healthy Bhikkhu inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another healthy Bhikkhu, let the Saêgha question and examine them both and treat them according to the law, and then hold Pavâraòâ.'




18

1. At that time a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, entered upon Vassa in a certain district of the Kosala country. These Bhikkhus, living in unity, and concord, and without quarrel, had found a comfortable place to dwell in. Now those Bhikkhus thought: 'Living in unity, &c., we have found a comfortable place to dwell in. If we hold Pavâraòâ now, (other Bhikkhus) might come on a journey, having held their Pavâraòâ, (and might occupy this place); thus we should lose this place which is comfortable to dwell in. Well, what are we to do?'

They told this thing to the Blessed One.

2. 'In case, O Bhikkhus, a number of Bhikkhus, companions and friends of each other, have entered upon Vassa in a certain district. These Bhikkhus, .... (&c., § 1).

'If these Bhikkhus think: "Living in unity, .... (&c., § 1, down to:) thus we should lose this place which is comfortable to dwell in," I allow, O Bhikkhus, these Bhikkhus to agree upon pavâraòâsaêgaha1.

Nota: 1. Literally this word means, we believe, 'Keeping back one's own pavâraòâsaêgaha.' Buddhaghosa says: When the decree of pavâraòâsaêgaha has been issued, the Bhikkhus (who have issued it) ought to live as in the rainy season. Incoming Bhikkhus are not allowed to take possession of their places of rest. On the other side, they ought not to interrupt their Vassa residence.'

3. 'And you ought, O Bhikkhus, to agree upon it in this way: Let them all assemble together. When they have assembled, let a learned, competent Bhikkhu proclaim the following ñatti before the Saêgha: "Let the Saêgha, reverend Sirs, hear me. Living in unity, .... (&c., § 1, down to :) thus we should lose this place which is comfortable to dwell in. If the Saêgha is ready, let the Saêgha agree upon pavâraòâsaêgaha; let it now hold Uposatha and recite the Pâtimokkha, and let the Saêgha hold Pavâraòâ on the next komudî kâtumâsinî day. This is the ñatti."

4. '"Let the Saêgha, &C.1"

Nota: 1. Here follows the usual formula of a ñattidutiya kamma as in Book II, chap. 6. Comp. the note on Book I, chap. 28, 3.

5. 'If, O Bhikkhus, after those Bhikkhus have agreed upon pavâraòâsaêgaha, a Bhikkhu should say: "I wish, friends, to go on my travels through the country; I have a business in the country," let them reply to him: "Good, friend, hold Pavâraòâ and go." If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, when holding Pavâraòâ inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another Bhikkhu, let (that other Bhikkhu) say to him: "You are not master of my Pavâraòâ, friend; I will not hold Pavâraòâ now."

'If, O Bhikkhus, when that Bhikkhu holds Pavâraòâ, another Bhikkhu inhibits his Pavâraòâ, let the Saêgha question and examine them both and treat them according to the law.

6. 'If that Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, has finished that business in the country and comes back to that district before the day of komudî kâtumâsinî, and if a Bhikkhu, O Bhikkhus, when the Bhikkhus hold Pavâraòâ, inhibits the Pavâraòâ of that Bhikkhu (who has been absent), let him say (to the inhibiting Bhikkhu): "You are not master of my Pavâraòâ, friend; I have held my Pavâraòâ."

'If, O Bhikkhus, when the Bhikkhus hold Pavâraòâ, this Bhikkhu inhibits the Pavâraòâ of another Bhikkhu, let the Saêgha question and examine them both and treat them according to the law, and then hold Pavâraòâ.'




End of the Pavâraòâ-Khandhaka





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  • —Supplement to the First Edition of the above. 4to. 2s. 6d.
  • A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language. By W. W. Skeat, M.A. Second Edition. 1885. Crown 8vo. 5s. 6d.

GREEK.—A Greek-English Lexicon, by Henry George Liddell, D.D., and Robert Scott, D.D. Seventh Edition, Revised and Augmented throughout. 1883. 4to. Il. i6s.

  • A Greek-English Lexicon, abridged from Liddell and Scott's 4to. edition, chiefly for the use of Schools. Twenty-first Edition. 1884. Square 12mo. 7s. 6d.
  • A copious Greek-English Vocabulary, compiled from the best authorities. 1850. 24mo. 3s.
  • A Practical Introduction to Greek Accentuation, by H. W. Chandler, M.A. Second Edition. 1881. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

HEBREW.—The Book of Hebrew Roots, by Abu 'l-Walîd Marwân ibn Janâh, otherwise called Rabbi Yônâh. Now first edited, with an Appendix, by Ad. Neubauer. 1875. 4to. 2l. 7s. 6d.

  • A Treatise on the use of the Tenses in Hebrew. By S. R. Driver, D.D. Second Edition. 1881. Extra fcap. 8vo. 7s. 6d.
  • Hebrew Accentuation of Psalms, Proverbs, and Job. By William Wickes, D.D. 1881. Demy 8vo. stiff covers, 5s.

ICELANDIC.—An Icelandic-English Dictionary, based on the MS. collections of the late Richard Cleasby. Enlarged and completed by G. Vigfusson, M.A. With an Introduction, and Life of Richard Cleasby, by G. Webbe Dasent, D.C.L. 1874. 4to. 3l. 7s.

  • A List of English Words the Etymology of which is illustrated by comparison with Icelandic. Prepared in the form of an APPENDIX to the above. By W. W. Skeat, M.A. 1876. stitched, 2s.
  • An Icelandic Primer, with Grammar, Notes, and Glossary. By Henry Sweet, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
  • An Icelandic Prose Reader, with Notes, Grammar and Glossary, by Dr. Gudbrand Vigfusson and F. York Powell, M.A. 1879. Extra fcap. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

LATIN.—A Latin Dictionary, founded on Andrews edition of Freund's Latin Dictionary, revised, enlarged, and in great part rewritten by Charlton T. Lewis, Ph.D., and Charles Short, LL.D. 1879. 4to 1l. 5s.

MELANESIAN.—The Melanesian Languages. By R. H. Codrington, D.D., of the Melanesian Mission. 8vo. 18s.

SANSKRIT.—A Practical Grammar of the Sanskrit Language, arranged with reference to the Classical Languages of Europe, for the use of English Students, by Sir M. Monier-Williams, M.A. Fourth Edition. 8vo. 15s.

  • A Sanskrit—English Dictionary, Etymologically and Philologically arranged, with special reference to Greek, Latin, German, Anglo-Saxon, English, and other cognate Indo-European Languages. By Sir M. Monier-Williams, M.A. 1872. 4to. 4l. 14s. 6d.

SANSKRIT.—Nalopákhyánam. Story of Nala, an Episode of the Maha-Bharata: the Sanskrit text, with a copious Vocabulary, and an improved version of Dean Milman's Translation, by Sir M. Monier-Williams, M.A. Second Edition, Revised and Improved. 1879. 8vo. 15s.

  • Sakuntalâ. A Sanskrit Drama, in Seven Acts. Edited by Sir M. Monier-Williams, M.A. Second Edition, 1876. 8vo. 21s.

SYRIAC.—Thesaurus Syriacus: collegerunt Quatremère, Bernstein, Lorsbach, Arnoldi, Agrell, Field, Roediger: edidit R. Payne Smith, S.T.P. Fasc. I-VI. 1868-83. sm. fol. each, 1l. 1s. Fasc. VII. 1l, 11s. 6d. Vol. I, containing Fasc. I-V, sm. fol. 5l. 5s.

  • The Book of Kalîlah and Dimnah. Translated from Arabic into Syriac. Edited by W. Wright, LL.D. 1884. 8vo. 21s.


GREEK CLASSICS, &c.


Aristophanes:—A Complete Concordance to the Comedies and Fragments. By Henry Dunbar, M.D. 4to. 1l. 1s.

Aristotle:—The Politics, with Introduction, Notes, etc., by W. L. Newman, M.A., Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. Vols. I. and II. Nearly ready.

Aristotle:—The Politics translated into English, with Intro duction, Marginal Analysis, Notes, and Indices, by B. Jowett, M.A. Medium Svo. 2 vols. 21s.

Catalogus Codicum Graecorum Sinaiticorum. Scripsit V. Gardthausen Lipsiensis. With six pages of Facsimiles. 8vo. linen, 25s.

Heracliti Ephesii Reliquiae. Recensuit I. Bywater, M.A. Appendicis loco additae sunt Diogenis Laertii Vita Heracliti, Particulae Hippocratei De Diaeta Libri Primi, Epistolae Heracliteae. 1877. 8vo. 6s.

Herculanensium Voluminum Partes II. 1824. 8vo. 10s.

Fragmenta Herculanensia. A Descriptive Catalogue of the Oxford copies of the Herculanean Rolls, together with the texts of several papyri, accompanied by facsimiles. Edited by Walter Scott, M.A., Fellow of Merton College, Oxford. Royal 8vo. cloth, 21s.

Homer:—A Complete Concordance to the Odyssey and Hymns of Homer; to which is added a Concordance to the Parallel Passages in the Iliad, Odyssey, and Hymns. By Henry Dunbar, M.D. 1880. 4to. 1l, 1s.

  • Scholia Graeca in Iliadem. Edited by Professor W. Dindorf, after a new collation of the Venetian MSS. by D. B. Monro, M.A., Provost of Oriel College. 4 vols. 8vo. 2l. 10s. Vols. V and VI. In the Press.
  • Scholia Graeca in Odysseam. Edidit Guil. Dindorfius. Tomi II. 1855. 8vo. 15s. 6d.

Plato:—Apology, with a revised Text and English Notes, and a Digest of Platonic Idioms, by James Riddell, M.A. 1878. 8vo. 8s. 6d.

  • Philebus, with a revised Text and English Notes, by Edward Poste, M.A. 1860. 8vo. 7s. 6d.
  • Sophistes and Politicus, with a revised Text and English Notes, by L. Campbell, M.A. 1867. 8vo. 18s.
  • Theaetetus, with a revised Text and English Notes. by L. Campbell, M.A. Second Edition. 8vo. 10s. 6d.
  • The Dialogues, translated into English, with Analyses and Introductions, by B. Jowett, M.A. A new Edition in 5 volumes, medium 8vo. 1875. 3l. 10s.
  • The Republic, translated into English, with an Analysis and Introduction, by B. Jowett, M.A. Medium 8vo. 12s. 6d.

Thucydides:—Translated into English, with Introduction, Marginal Analysis, Notes, and Indices. By B. Jowett, M.A. 2 vols. 1881. Medium 8vo. 1l. 12s.


THE HOLY SCRIPTUKES, &c.



STUDIA BIBLICA.—Essays in Biblical Archaeology and Criticism, and kindred subjects. By Members of the University of Oxford. 8vo. 10s. 6d.





ENGLISH.—The Holy Bible in the earliest English Versions, made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe and his followers: edited by the Rev. J. Forshall and Sir F. Madden. 4 vols. 1850. Royal 4to. 3l. 3s.


(Also reprinted from the above, with Introduction and Glossary by W. W. Skeat, M.A.


  • The Books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon: according to the Wycliffite Version made by Nicholas de Hereford, about A.D. 1381, and Revised by John Purvey, about A.D. 1388. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
  • The New Testament in English, according to the Version by John Wycliffe, about A.D. 1380, and Revised by John Purvey, about A.D. 1388. Extra fcap. 8vo 6s.)




ENGLISH.—The Holy Bible: an exact reprint, page for page, of the Authorised Version published in the year 1611. Demy 4to. half bound, 1l. 1s.

  • The Psalter, or Psalms of David, and certain Canticles, with a Translation and Exposition in English, by Richard Rolle of Hampole. Edited by H. R. Bramley, M.A., Fellow of S. M. Magdalen College, Oxford. With an Introduction and Glossary. Demy 8vo. 1l, 1s.
  • Lectures on Ecclesiastes. Delivered in Westminster Abbey by the Very Rev. George Granville Bradley, D.D., Dean of Westminster. Crown 8vo. 4s. 6d.

GOTHIC.—The Gospel of St. Mark in Gothic, according to the translation made by Wulfila in the Fourth Century. Edited with a Grammatical Introduction and Glossarial Index by W. W. Skeat, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 4s.

GREEK.—Vetus Testamentum ex Versione Septuaginta Interpretum secundum exemplar Vaticantim Romae editum. Accedit potiorvarietas Codicis Alexandrini. Tomi III. Editio Altera. 18mo. 18s.

  • Origenis Hexaplorum quae supersunt; sive, Veterum Interpretum Graecorum in totum Vetus Testamentum Fragmenta. Edidit Fridericus Field, A.M. 2 vols. 1875. 4 to 5l. 5s.
  • The Book of Wisdom: the Greek Text, the Latin Vulgate, and the Authorised English Version; with an Introduction, Critical Apparatus, and a Commentary. By William J. Deane, M.A. Small 4to. 12s. 6d.
  • Novum Testamentum Graece. Antiquissimorum Codicum Textus in ordine parallelo dispositi. Accedit collatio Codicis Sinaitici. Edidit E. H. Hansell, S.T.B. Tomi III. 1864. 8vo. half morocco. Price reduced to 24s.
  • Novum Testamentum Graece. Accedunt parallela S. Scripturae loca, etc. Edidit Carolus Lloyd, S.T.P.R. 18mo. 3s. On writing paper, with wide margin, 10s.
  • Novum Testamentum Graece juxta Exemplar Millianum. 18mo. 2s.6d. On writing paper, with wide margin, 9s.
  • Evangelia Sacra Graece. Fcap. 8vo. limp, 1s. 6d.
  • The Greek Testament, with the Readings adopted by the Revisers of the Authorised Version:—
    • (1) Pica type, with Marginal References. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    • (2) Long Primer type. Fcap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
    • (3) The same, on writing paper, with wide margin, 15s.
  • The Parallel New Testament, Greek and English; being the Authorised Version, 1611; the Revised Version, 1881; and the Greek Text followed in the Revised Version. 8vo. 12s. 6d.

The Revised Version is the joint property of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge .

GREEK.—Canon Muratorianus: the earliest Catalogue of the Books of the New Testament. Edited with Notes and a Facsimile of the MS. in the Ambrosian Library at Milan, by S. P. Tregelles, LL.D. 1867. 4to. 10s. 6d.

  • Outlines of Textual Criticism applied to the New Testament. By C. E. Hammond, M.A. Fourth Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.

HEBREW, etc.—The Psalms in Hebrew without points. 1879. Crown 8vo. 3s. 6d.

  • A Commentary on the Book of Proverbs. Attributed to Abraham Ibn Ezra. Edited from a MS. in the Bodleian Library by S. R. Driver, M.A. Crown 8vo. paper covers, 3s. 6d.
  • —The Book of Tobit. A Chaldee Text, from a unique MS. in the Bodleian Library; with other Rabbinical Texts, English Translations, and the Itala. Edited by Ad. Neubauer, M.A. 1878. Crown 8vo. 6s.
  • —Horae Hebraicae et Talmudicae, a J. Lightfoot. A new Edition, by R. Gandell, M.A. 4 vols. 1859. 8vo. 1l. 1s.

LATIN.—Libri Psalmorum Versio antiqua Latina, cum Paraphrasi Anglo-Saxonica. Edidit B. Thorpe, F.A.S. 1835. 8vo. 10s 6d.

  • Old-Latin Biblical Texts: No. I. The Gospel according to St. Matthew from the St. Germain MS. (g1). Edited with Introduction and Appendices by John Wordsworth, D.D. Small 4to., stiff covers, 6s.
  • Old-Latin Biblical Texts: No. II. Portions of the Gospels according to St. Mark and St. Matthew, from the Bobbio MS. (k), &c. Edited by John Wordsworth, D.D., W. Sanday, M.A., D.D., and H. J. White, M.A. Small 4to., stiff covers, 21s.

OLD-FRENCH.—Libri Psalmorum Versio antiqua Gallica e Cod. MS. in Bibl. Bodleiana adservato, una cum Versione Metrica aliisque Monumentis pervetustis. Nunc primum descripsit et edidit Franciscus Michel, Phil. Doc. 1860. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

FATHERS OF THE CHURCH, &c.

St. Athanasius:—Historical Writings, according to the Benedictine Text. With an Introduction by William Bright, D.D. 1881. Crown 8vo. 10s. 6d.

  • Orations against the Arians. With an Account of his Life by William Bright, D.D. 1873. Crown 8vo. 9s.

St. Augustine:—Select Anti-Pelagian Treatises, and the Acts of the Second Council of Orange. With an Introduction by William Bright, D.D. Crown 9vo. 9s.

  • Canons of the First Four General Councils of Nicaea, Con stantinople, Ephesus, and Chalcedon. 1877. Crown 8vo. 2s. 6d.

  • Notes on the Canons of the First Four General Councils. By William Bright, D.D. 1882. Crown 8vo. 5s. 6d.

Cyrilli Archiepiscopi Alexandrini in XII Prophetas. Edidit P. E. Pusey, A.M. Tomi II. 1868. 8vo. cloth, 2l. 2s.

  • in D. Joannis Evangelium. Accedunt Fragmenta varia necnon Tractatus ad Tiberium Diaconum duo. Edidit post Aubertum P. E. Pusey, A.M. Tomi III. 1872. 8vo. 2l. 5s.
  • —Commentarii in Lucae Evangelium quae supersunt Syriace. E MSS. apud Mus. Britan. edidit R. Payne Smith, A.M. 1858. 4to. 1l. 2s.
  • —Translated by R. Payne Smith, M.A. 2 vols. 1859. 8vo. 14s.

Ephraemi Syri, Rabulae Episcopi Edesseni, Balaei, aliorumque Opera Selecta. E Codd. Syriacis MSS. in Museo Britannico et Bibliotheca Bodleiana asservatis primus edidit J. J. Overbeck. 1865. 8vo. 1l. 1s.

Eusebius Ecclesiastical History, according to the text of Burton, with an Introduction by William Bright, D.D. 1881. Crown 8vo. 8s. 6d.

Irenaeus: The Third Book of St. Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons, against Heresies. With short Notes and a Glossary by H. Deane, B.D. 1874. Crown 8vo. 5s. 6d.

Patrum Apostolicorum, S. Clementis Romani, S. Ignatii, S. Polycarpi, quae supersunt. Edidit Guil. Jacobson, S.T.P.R. Tomi II. Fourth Edition, 1863. 8vo. 1l. 1s.

Socrates' Ecclesiastical History, according to the Text of Hussey, with an Introduction by William Bright, D.D. 1878. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.


ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY, &c.


Ancient Liturgy of the Church of England, according to the uses of Sarum, York, Hereford, and Bangor, and the Roman Liturgy arranged in parallel columns, with preface and notes. By William Maskell, M.A Third Edition. 1882. 8vo. 15s.

Baedae Historia Ecclesiastica. Edited, with English Notes, by G. H. Moberly, M.A. 1881. Crown 8vo. 10s. 6d.

Bright ( W.}. Chapters of Early English Church History. 1878. 8vo. 12s.

Burnef's History of the Reformation of the Church of England. A new Edition. Carefully revised, and the Records collated with the originals, by N. Pocock, M.A. 7 vols. 1865. 8vo. Price reduced to 1l. 10s.

Councils and Ecclesiastical Documents relating to Great Britain and Ireland. Edited, after Spelman and Wilkins, by A. W. Haddan, B.D., and W. Stubbs, M.A. Vols. 1. and III. 1869-71. Medium 8vo. each 1l. 1s.

  • Vol. II. Part I. 1873. Medium 8 vo. IO.T. 6d.
  • Vol. II. Part II. 1878. Church of Ireland; Memorials of St. Patrick. Stiff covers, 3s. 6d.

Hamilton (John, Archbishop of St. Andrews], The Catechism of. Edited, with Introduction and Glossary, by Thomas Graves Law. With a Preface by the Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone. 8vo. 12s. 6d.

Hammond (C. E.). Liturgies, Eastern and Western. Edited, with Introduction, Notes, and Liturgical Glossary. 1878. Crown 8vo. 10s.6d.

An Appendix to the above. 1879. Crown 8vo. paper covers, 1s. 6d.

John, Bishop of Ephesus. The Third Part of his Eccle siastical History. (In Syriac.) Now first edited by William Cureton, M.A. 1853. 4to. 1l. 12s.

  • —Translated by R. Payne Smith, M.A. 1860. 8vo. 10s.

Leofric Missal, The, as used in the Cathedral of Exeter during the Episcopate of its first Bishop, A.D. 1050-1072; together with some Account of the Red Book of Derby, the Missal of Robert of Jumieges, and a few other early M.S. Service Books of the English Church. Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by F. E. Warren, B.D. 4to. half morocco, 35s.

Monumenta Ritualia Ecclesiae Anglicanae. The occasional Offices of the Church of England according to the old use of Salisbury, the Prymer in English, and other prayers and forms, with dissertations and notes. By William Maskell, M.A. Second Edition. 1882. 3 vols. 8vo. 2l. 10s.

Records of the Reformation. The Divorce, 1527-1533. Mostly now for the first time printed from MSS. in the British Museum and other libraries. Collected and arranged by N. Pocock, M.A. 1870. 2 vols. 8vo. 1l. 16s.

Shirley ( W. W.}. Some Account of the Church in the Apostolic Age. Second Edition, 1874. Fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.

Stubbs ( W.). Registrum Sacrum Anglicanum. An attempt to exhibit the course of Episcopal Succession in England. 1858. Small 4to. 8s. 6d.

Warren (F. E.). Liturgy and Ritual of the Celtic Church. 1881. 8vo. 14s.


ENGLISH THEOLOGY.


Bampton Lectures, 1886. The Christian Platonists of Alexandria. By Charles Bigg, D.D. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

Butler's Works, with an Index to the Analogy. 2, vols. 1874. 8vo. 11s.

Also separately,

Sermons, 5s. 6d.

Analogy of Religion, 5s. 6d

Greswells Harmonia Evangelica. Fifth Edition. 8vo. 1855. 9s. 6d.

Heurtley's Harmonia Symbolica: Creeds of the Western Church. 1858. 8vo. 6s. 6d.

Homilies appointed to be read in Churches. Edited by J. Griffiths, M.A. 1859. 8vo. 7s. 6d.

Hooker's Works, with his life by Walton, arranged by John Keble, M.A. Sixth Edition, 1874. 3 vols. 8vo. 1l. 11s. 6d.

  • —the text as arranged by John Keble, M.A. 2, vols. 1875. 8vo. 11s.

Jewel's Works. Edited by R. W. Jelf, D.D. 8 vols. 1848. 8vo. 1l. 10s.

Pearson's Exposition of the Creed. Revised and corrected by E. Burton, D.D. Sixth Edition, 1877. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

Waterland's Review of the Doctrine of the Eucharist, with a Preface by the late Bishop of London. Crown 8vo. 6s. 6d.

  • —Works, with Life, by Bp. Van Mildert. A new Edition, with copious Indexes. 6 vols. 1856. 8vo. 2l. 11s.

Wheatty's Illustration of the Book of Common Prayer. A new
Edition, 1846. 8vo. 5s.

Wyclif. A Catalogue of the Original Works of John Wyclif, by W. W. Shirley, D.D. 1865. 8vo. 3s. 6d.

  • Select English Works. By T. Arnold, M.A. 3 vols. 1869-1871. 8vo. 1l. 1s.

Trialogus. With the Supplement now first edited. By Gotthard Lechler. 1869. 8vo. 7s.


HISTORICAL AND DOCUMENTARY WORKS


British Barrows, a Record of the Examination of Sepulchral Mounds in various parts of England. By William Greenwell, M.A., F.S.A. Together with Description of Figures of Skulls, General Remarks on Prehistoric Crania, and an Appendix by George Rolleston, M.D., F.R.S. 1877. Medium 8vo. 25s.

Britton. A Treatise upon the Common Law of England , composed by order of King Edward I. The French Text carefully revised, with an English Translation, Introduction, and Notes, by F. M. Nichols, M.A. 2 vols. 1865. Royal 8vo. 1l. 16s.

Clarendon's History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England. 7 vols. 1839. i8mo. 1l. 1s.

Clarendon's History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England. Also his Life, written by himself, in which is included a Continuation of his History of the Grand Rebellion. With copious Indexes. In one volume, royal 8vo. 1842. 1l. 2s.

Clinton's Epitome of the Fasti Hellenici. 1851. 8vo. 6s. 6d.

  • Epitome of the Fasti Romani. 1854. 8vo. 7s.

Corpus Poeticum Boreale. The Poetry of the Old Northern Tongue, from the Earliest Times to the Thirteenth Century. Edited, classified, and translated, with Introduction, Excursus, and Notes, by Gudbrand Vigfusson, M.A., and F. York Powell, M.A. 2 vols. 1883. 8vo. 42s.

Freeman (E. A.). History of the Norman Conquest of Eng land; its Causes and Results. In Six Volumes. 8vo. 5l. 9s. 6d.

  • The Reign of William Rufus and the Accession of Henry the First. 2 vols. 8vo. 1l. 16s.

Gascoigne's Theological Dictionary ("Liber Veritatum"): Selected Passages, illustrating the condition of Church and State, 1403-1458. With an Introduction by James E. Thorold Rogers, M.A. Small 4to. 10s. 6d.

Magna Carta, a careful Reprint. Edited by W. Stubbs, D.D. 1879. 4 to - stitched, 1s.

Passio et Miracula Beati Olaui. Edited from a Twelfth Century MS. in the Library of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, with an Introduction and Notes, by Frederick Metcalfe, M.A. Small 4to. stiff covers, 6s.

Protests of the Lords, including those which have been ex punged, from 1624 to 1874; with Historical Introductions. Edited by James E. Thorold Rogers, M.A. 1875. 3 vols. 8vo. 2l. 2s.

Rogers (J. E. T.). History of Agriculture and Prices in England, A.D. 1259-1793.

  • Vols. I and II (1259-1400). 1866. 8vo. 2l. 2s.
  • Vols. III and IV (1401-1582). 1882. 8vo. 2l. 10s.

Saxon Chronicles (Two of the} parallel, with Supplementary Extracts from the Others. Edited, with Introduction, Notes, and a Glossarial Index, by J. Earle, M.A. 1865. 8vo. 16s.

Stubbs (W., D.D.). Seventeen Lectures on the Study of Medieval and Modern History, &c., delivered at Oxford 1867-1884. Demy 8vo. half-bound, 10s. 6d.

Sturlunga Saga, including the Islendinga Saga of Lawman Sturla Thordsson and other works. Edited by Dr. Gudbrand Vigfusson. In 2 vols. 1878. 8vo. 2l. 2s.

York Plays. The Plays performed by the Crafts or Mysteries of York on the day of Corpus Christi in the I4th, 15th, and i6th centuries. Now first printed from the unique MS. in the Library of Lord Ashburnham. Edited with Introduction and Glossary by Lucy Toulmin Smith. 8vo. 21s.





Statutes made for the University of Oxford, and for the Colleges and Halls therein, by the University of Oxford Commissioners. 1882. 8vo. 12s. 6d.

Statuta Universitatis Oxoniensis. 1886. 8vo. 5s

The Examination Statutes for the Degrees of B.A., B. Mus., B.C.L., and B.M. Revised to Hilary Term, 1887. 8vo. sewed, 1s.

The Student's Handbook to the University and Colleges of Oxford. Extra fcap. 8vo. 2s. 6d.

The Oxford University Calendar for the year 1887. Crown 8vo. 4s. 6d.

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The Honours Register of the University of Oxford. A complete Record of University Honours, Officers, Distinctions, and Class Lists; of the Heads of Colleges, &c., &c., from the Thirteenth Century to 1883.




MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL SCIENCE, &c.

Acland(H. W., M.D., F.R.S.). Synopsis of the Pathological

Series in the Oxford Museum. 1867. 8vo. 2s. 6d.

De Bary (Dr. A.}. Comparative Anatomy of the Vegetative Organs of the Phanerogams and Ferns. Translated and Annotated by F. O. Bower, M.A., F.L.S., and D. H. Scott, M.A., Ph.D., F.L.S. With 241 woodcuts and an Index. Royal 8vo., half morocco, 1l. 2s. 6d.

Goebel (Dr. K.). Outlines of Classification and Special Mor phology of Plants. A New Edition of Sachs Text Book of Botany, Book II. English Translation by H. E. F. Garnsey, M.A. Revised by I. Bayley Balfour, M.A., M.D., F.R.S. With 407 Woodcuts. Royal 8vo. half Morocco, 21s.

Lectures on the Physiology of Plants. By Julius Sachs. Trans lated by H. Marshall Ward, M.A. With 445 Woodcuts. Royal 8vo. Just ready.

Müller (J). On certain Variations in the Vocal Organs of the Passeres that have hitherto escaped notice. Translated by F. J. Bell, B.A., and edited, with an Appendix, by A. H. Garrod. M.A., F.R.S. With Plates. 1878. 4to. paper covers, 7s. 6d.

Price (Bartholomew, M.A., F.R.S.}. Treatise on Infinitesimal Calculus.

  • Vol. I. Differential Calculus. Second Edition. 8vo. 14s. 6d.
  • Vol. II. Integral Calculus, Calculus of Variations, and Differential Equations. Second Edition, 1865. 8vo. 18s.
  • Vol. III. Statics, including Attractions; Dynamics of a Material Particle. Second Edition, 1868. 8vo. 16s.
  • Vol. IV. Dynamics of Material Systems; together with a chapter on Theo retical Dynamics, by W. F. Donkin, M.A., F.R.S. 1862. 8vo. 16s.

Pritchard (C., D.D., F.R.S.). Uranometria Nova Oxoniensis. A Photometric determination of the magnitudes of all Stars visible to the naked eye, Irom the Pole to ten degrees south of the Equator. 1885. Royal 8vo. 8s. 6d.

Astronomical Observations made at the University Observatory, Oxford, under the direction of C. Pritchard, D.D. No. I. 1878. Royal 8vo. paper covers, 3s. 6d.

Rigaud's Correspondence of Scientific Men of the 17th Century, with Table of Contents by A. de Morgan, and Index by the Rev. J. Rigaud, M.A. 2 vols. 1841-1862. 8vo. 18s. 6d.

Rolleston (George, M.D., F.R.S.). Scientific Papers and Addresses. Arranged and Edited by William Turner, M.B., F.R.S. With a Biographical Sketch by Edward Tylor, F.R.S. With Portrait, Plates, and Woodcuts. 2 vols. 8vo. 1l. 4s.

Westwood (J. O., M.A., F.R.S.). Thesaurus Entomologicus Hopeianus, or a Description of the rarest Insects in the Collection given to the University by the Rev. William Hope. With 40 Plates. 1874. Small folio, half morocco, 7l. 10s.

The Sacred Books of the East

TRANSLATED BY VARIOUS ORIENTAL SCHOLARS, AND EDITED BY F. MAX MULLER.

(Demy 8vo. cloth.)


Vol. I. The Upanishads. Translated by F. Max Muller. Part I.
  • The Khândogya-upanishad
  • ,
  • The Talavakâra-upanishad
  • ,
  • The Aitareya-âraòyaka
  • ,
  • The Kaushîtaki-brâhmaòa-upanishad
  • , and The
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Vol. XXV. Manu. Translated by Georg Bühler. 21s.

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Vol. XXXI. The Zend-Avesta. Part III. The Yasna, Visparad, Âfrînagân, and Gâhs. Translated by the Rev. L. H. Mills, Just ready.

Vol. XXXII. Vedic Hymns. Translated by F. Max Müller Part I.

Vol. XXXIII. Nârada, and some Minor Law-books. Translated by Julius Jolly. (Preparing)

Vol. XXXIV. The Vedânta-Sûtras, with Äaôkara's Commentary. Translated by G. Thibaut. {Preparing)

The Second Series will consist of Twenty-Four Volumes.





CLARENDON PRESS SERIES





I. ENGLISH, &c.


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OLD ENGLISH DRAMA.

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Wordsworth (J., M.A.}. Fragments and Specimens of Early Latin. With Introductions and Notes. 1874. 8vo. 18s.

III. GREEK
A Greek Primer, for the use of beginners in that Language. By the Right Rev. Charles Wordsworth, D.C.L. Seventh Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 1s. 6d.
Easy Greek Reader. By Evelyn Abbott, M.A. In two Parts. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s.
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Graecae Grammaticae Rudimenta in usum Scholarum. Auc tore Carolo Wordsworth, D.C.L. Nineteenth Edition, 1882. 12mo. 4s.
A Greek-English Lexicon, abridged from Liddell and Scott's 4to. edition, chiefly for the use of Schools. Twenty-first Edition. 1884. Square 12mo. 7s. 6d.
Greek Verbs, Irregular and Defective; their forms, meaning, and quantity; embracing all the Tenses used by Greek writers, with references to the passages in which they are found. By W. Veitch. Fourth Edition. Crown 8vo. 10s. 6d.
The Elements of Greek Accentuation (for Schools): abridged from his larger work by H. W. Chandler, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 1s. 6d.
A SERIES OF GRADUATED GREEK READERS:
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Second Greek Reader. By A. M. Bell, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
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Fifth Greek Reader. Selections from Greek Epic and Dramatic Poetry, with Introductions and Notes. By Evelyn Abbott, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
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Aristotle's Politics. By W. L.Newman, M.A. (In the Press.)
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Head (Barclay V.}. His tor ia Numorum: A Manual of Greek Numismatics. Royal 8vo. half-bound. 2l. 2s. Just Published.
Hicks (E. L., M.A.}. A Manual of Greek Historical Inscriptions. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
Homer. Odyssey, Books I-XII. Edited with English Notes, Appendices, etc. By W. W. Merry, M.A., and the late James Riddell, M.A. 1886. Second Edition. Demy 8vo. 16s.
Homer. Homer. A Grammar of the Homeric Dialect. By D. B. Monro, M.A. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
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IV. FRENCH AND ITALIAN
Brackets Etymological Dictionary of the French Language, with a Preface on the Principles of French Etymology. Translated into English by G. W. Kitchin, D.D. Third Edition. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.
Historical Grammar of the French Language. Translated into English by G. W. Kitchin, D.D. Fourth Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
Works by GEORGE SAINTS BURY, M.A.
Primer of French Literature. Extra fcap. 8vo. 2s.
Short History of French Literature. Crown 8 vo. 10s. 6d.
Specimens of French Literature, from Villon to Hugo. Crown 8vo. 9s.

MASTERPIECES OF THE FRENCH DRAMA
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Maistre, Xavier de. Voyage autour de ma Chambre. Ourika, by Madame de Duras; Le Vieux Tailleur, by AIM. Erckniann-Chatrian; La Veillée de Vincennes, by Alfred de Vigny; Les Jumeaux de I'Holel Corneille, by Edmond About; Mésaventuresd un Écolier, by Rodolphe Töpffer. Third Edition, Revised and Corrected. Extra fcap. 8vo. 2s. 6d.
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Dante. Selections from the Inferno. With Introduction and Notes. By H. B. Cotterill, B.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
Tasso. La Gerusalemme Liberata. Cantos I, II. With Introduction and Notes. By the same Editor. Extra fcap. 8vo. 1s. 6d.
V. GERMAN
Scherer (W.}. A History of German Literature. Translated from the Third German Edition by Mrs. F. Conybeare. Edited by F. Max Müller. 2 vols. 8vo. 21s.
Max Müller. The German Classics, from the Fourth to the Nineteenth Century. With Biographical Notices, Translations into Modern German, and Notes. By F. Max Müller, M.A. A New Edition, Revised, Enlarged, and Adapted to Wilhelm Scherer's History of German Literature, by F. Lichtenstein. 2 vols. crown 8vo. 21s.
GERMAN COURSE. By HERMANN LANGE
The Germans at Home; a Practical Introduction to German Conversation, with an Appendix containing the Essentials of German Grammar. Second Edition. 8vo. 2s. 6d.
The German Manual; a German Grammar, Reading Book, and a Handbook of German Conversation. 8vo. 7s. 6d.
Grammar of the German Language. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
German Composition; A Theoretical and Practical Guide to the Art of Translating English Prose into German. 8vo. 4s. 6d.

Lessing's Laokoon. With Introduction, English Notes, etc. By A Hamann, Phil. Doc., M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. Translated into English Verse by E. Massie, M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo. 5s.
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  • Iphigenie auf Tauris. A Drama. With a Critical In troduction and Notes. Second Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s.
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Heine's Harzreise. With Life of Heine, Descriptive Sketch of the Harz, and Index. Extra fcap. 8vo. paper covers, 1s. 6d.; cloth, 2s. 6d.
Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm. A Comedy. With a Life of Lessing, Critical Analysis, etc. Extra fcap. 8vo. 3s. 6d.
Nathan der Weise. With Introduction, Notes, etc. Extra fcap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
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    Niebuhr's Griechische Heroen-Geschichten. Tales of Greek Heroes. Edited with English Notes and a Vocabulary, by Emma S. Buchheim. School Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo., cloth, 2s. Stiff covers, 1s. 6d.
    VI. MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL SCIENCE, &c.
    By LEWIS HENSLEY, M.A.
    Figures made Easy: a first Arithmetic Book. Crown 8vo. 6d.
    Answers to the Examples in Figures made Easy> together with two thousand additional Examples, with Answers. Crown 8vo. 1s.
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    Aldis (W. S., M.A.}. A Text-Book of Algebra. Crown 8vo. Nearly ready.
    Baynes (R. E., M.A.}. Lessons on Thermodynamics. 1878. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.
    Chambers (G. F., F.R.A.S.). A Handbook of Descriptive Astronomy. Third Edition. 1877. Demy 8vo. 28s.
    Clarke (Col. A. R., C.B., R.E.}. Geodesy. 1880. 8vo. 12s. 6d.
    Cremona (Lriigi}. Elements of Projective Geometry. Translated by C. Leudesdorf, M.A. 8vo. 12s. 6d.
    Donkin. Acoustics. Second Edition. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.
    Euclid Revised. Containing the Essentials of the Elements of Plane Geometry as given by Euclid in his first Six Books. Edited by R. C. J. Nixon, M.A. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.
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    Galton (Douglas, C.B., F.R.S.}. The Construction of Healthy Dwellings. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    Hamilton (Sir R. G. C.), and J. Ball. Book-keeping. New and enlarged Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. limp cloth, 2s.
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    Harcourt (A. G. Vernon, M.A.), and H. G. Madan, M.A. Exercises in Practical Chemistry. Vol. I. Elementary Exercises. Third Edition. Crown 8vo. 9s.
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    Minchin (G. M., M.A.}. A Treatise on Statics with Applica tions to Physics. Third Edition, Corrected and Enlarged. Vol. I. Equilibrium of Coplanar Forces. 8vo. 9s. Vol. II. Statics. 8vo. 16s.
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    Phillips (John, M.A., F.R.S.). Geology of Oxford and the Valley of the Thames. 1871. 8vo. 21s.
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    Prestwich (Joseph, M.A., F.R.S.). Geology, Chemical, Physical, and Stratigraphical. Vol.1. Chemical and Physical. Royal 8vo. 25s.
    Roach (T., M.A.}. Elementary Trigonometry. Crown 8vo. Nearly ready.
    Rollestons Forms of Animal Life. Illustrated by Descriptions and Drawings of Dissections. New Edition. {Nearly ready.}
    Smyth. A Cycle of Celestial Objects. Observed, Reduced, and Discussed by Admiral W. H. Smyth, R.N. Revised, condensed, and greatly enlarged by G. F. Chambers, F.R.A.S. 1881. 8vo. Price reduced to 12s.
    Stewart (Balfour, LL.D., F.R.S.). A Treatise on Heat, with numerous Woodcuts and Diagrams. Fourth Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 7s. 6d.
    Vernon-Harcourt (L. F., M.A.). A Treatise on Rivers and Canals, relating to the Control and Improvement of Rivers, and the Design, Construction, and Development of Canals. 2 vols. (Vol. I, Text. Vol. II, Plates.) 8vo. 21s.
    • Harbours and Docks; their Physical Features, History, Construction, Equipment, and Maintenance; with Statistics as to their Commercial Development. 2 vols. 8vo. 25s.
    Watson (H. IV., M.A.). A Treatise on the Kinetic Theory of Gases. 1876. 8vo. 3*. 6d.
    Watson (H. W., D. Sc., F.K.S.), and S. H. Burbiiry, M.A.
    • I. A Treatise on the Application of Generalised Coordinates to the Kinetics of a Material System. 1879. 8 vo. 6s.
    • II. The Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. Vol. I. Electro statics. 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    Williamson (A. W., Phil. Doc., F.R.S.}. Chemistry for Students. A new Edition, with Solutions. 1873. Extra fcap. 8vo. 8s. 6d.
    VII. HISTORY
    Bluntschli (J. K.). The Theory of the State. By J. K. Bluntschli, late Professor of Political Sciences in the University of Heidelberg. Authorised English Translation from the Sixth German Edition. Demy Svo. half bound, 12s. 6d.
    Finlay (George, LL.D.). A History of Greece from its Con quest by the Romans to the present time, B.C. 146 to A.D. 1864. A new Edition, revised throughout, and in part re-written, with considerable additions, by the Author, and edited by H. F. Tozer, M.A. 7 vols. 8vo. 3l. 10s.
    Fortescue (Sir John, Kt.). The Governance of England: otherwise called The Difference between an Absolute and a Limited Monarchy. A Revised Text. Edited, with Introduction, Notes, and Appendices, by Charles Plummer, M.A. 8vo. half bound, 12s. 6d.
    Freeman (E.A., D.C.L.). A Short History of the Norman Conquest of England. Second Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 2s. 6d.
    George (H. B..M.A.). Genealogical Tables illustrative of Modern History. Third Edition, Revised and Enlarged. Small 4to. 12s.
    Hodgkin (T.). Italy and her Invaders. Illustrated with Plates and Maps. Vols. I IV., A.D. 376-553. 8vo. 3l. 8s.
    Kitchin (G.W.,D.D.). A History of France. With numerous Maps, Plans, and Tables. In Three Volumes. Second Edition. Crown 8vo. each 10s. 6d.
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    • Vol. 2. From 1453-1624.
    • Vol. 3. From 1624-1793.
    Payne (E. J., M.A.}. A History of the United States of America. In the Press.
    Ranke (L. von}. A History of England, principally in the Seventeenth Century. Translated by Resident Members of the University of Oxford, under the superintendence of G. W. Kitchin, D.D., and C. W Boase M.A. 1875. 6 vols. 8vo. 3l. 3s.
    Rawlinson (George, M.A.). A Manual of Ancient History. Second Edition. Demy 8vo. 14s.
    Rogers (J. E. Thorold, M.A.*). The First Nine Years of the Bank of England. 8vo. cloth. Just ready.
    Select Charters and other Illustrations of English Constitutional History, from the Earliest Times to the Reign of Edward I. Arranged and edited by W. Stubbs, D.D. Fifth Edition. 1883. Crown 8vo. 8s. 6d.
    Stubbs ( W., D.D.). The Constitutional History of England, in its Origin and Development. Library Edition. 3 vols. demy 8vo. 2l. 8s.
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    • Seventeen Lectures on the Study of Medieval and Modern History, &c., delivered at Oxford 1867-1884. Demy Svo. half-bound 10s. 6d.
    Wellesley. A Selection from the Despatches, Treaties, and other Papers of the Marquess Wellesley, K.G., during his Government of India. Edited by S. J. Owen, M.A. 1877. 8vo. 1l. 4s.
    Wellington. A Selection from the Despatches, Treaties, and other Papers relating to India of Field-Marshal the Duke of Wellington K. G. Edited by S. J. Owen, M.A. 1880. 8vo. 24s.
    A History of British India. By S. J. Owen, M.A., Reader in Indian History in the University of Oxford. In preparation.
    VIII. LAW
    Alberici Gentilis, I.C.D., I.C., De lure Belli Libri Tres. Edidit T. E. Holland, I.C.D. 1877. Small 4to. half morocco, 21s.
    Anson (Sir William R., Bart., D.C.L.}. Principled of the English Law of Contract, and of Agency in its Relation to Contract. Fourth Edition. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
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    Bentham (Jeremy]. An Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation. Crown Svo. 6s. 6d.
    Digby (Kenelm E., M.A.). An Introduction to the History of the Law of Real Property. Third Edition. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    Gaii Institutionnm Juris Civilis Commentarii Quattuor; or, Elements of Roman Law by Gains. With a Translation and Commentary by Edward Poste, M.A. Second Edition. 1875. 8vo. 18s.
    Hall ( W. E., M.A.). International Law. Second Ed. 8vo. 21s.
    Holland (T. E., D.C.L.). The Elements of Jurisprudence. Third Edition. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    • The European Concert in the Eastern Question, a Collection of Treaties and other Public Acts. Edited, with Introductions and Notes, by Thomas Erskine Holland, D.C.L. 8vo. 12s. 6d.
    Imperatoris lustiniani Institutionum Libri Quattuor; with Introductions, Commentary. Excursus and Translation. By J. E. Moyle, B.C.L.. M.A. 2 vols. Demy 8vo. 21s.
    Justinian, The Institutes of, edited as a recension of the Institutes of Gains, by Thomas Erskine Holland, D.C.L. Second Edition, 1881. Extra fcap. 8vo. 5s.
    Justinian, Select Titles from the Digest of. By T. E. Holland, D.C.L., and C. L. Shadwell, B.C.L. 8vo. 14s.
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    Lex Aquilia. The Roman Law of Damage to Property: being a Commentary on the Title of the Digest Ad Legem Aquiliam (ix. 2). With an Introduction to the Study of the Corpus luris Civilis. By Erwin Grueber, Dr. Jur., M.A. Demy 8vo. 10s. 6d.
    Markby ( W., D.C.L.). Elements of Law Considered with reference to Principles of General Jurisprudence. Third Edition. Demy 8vo. 12s. 6d.
    Twiss (Sir Travers, D.C.L.}. The Law of Nations considered as Independent Political Communities.
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    IX. MENTAL AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY, &c.
    Bacon's Novum Organum. Edited, with English Notes, by G. W. Kitchin, D.D. 1855. 8vo. 9s. 6d.
    • —Translated by G. W. Kitchin, D.D. 1855. 8vo. 9s. 6d.
    Berkeley. The Works of George Berkeley, D.D., formerly Bishop of Cloyne; including many of his writings hitherto unpublished. With Prefaces, Annotations, and an Account of his Life and Philosophy, by Alexander Campbell Eraser, M.A. 4 vols. 1871. 8vo. 2l. 18s.
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    • Selections from. With an Introduction and Notes. For the use of Students in the Universities. By Alexander Campbell Eraser, LL.D. Second Edition. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.
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    The Oxford Bible for Teachers, containing supplementary HELPS TO THE STUDY OF THE BIBLE, including Summaries of the several Books, with copious Explanatory Notes and Tables illustrative of Scripture History and the characteristics of Bible Lands; with a complete Index of Subjects, a Concordance, a Dictionary of Proper Names, and a series of Maps. Prices in various sizes and bindings from 3s. to 2l. 5s.
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    Vinayapitaka. English Vinaya texts .
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    A



    • Abhayûvara: Abhayûvara means, secure from anything. This refers to the expression used in chap. 42, § 2. of Vinaya Texts.
    • Abhidhânappadipikâ
    • abhihaùùhuê
    • Abhihaùuê pavâreyyâ ti yâvatakaê ikkhasi tâvatakaê ganhâhiti
    • abhiharitvâ
    • abhihaùuê
    • abhihaùùhuê
    • abhihaùuê
    • abhîkshòam ('repeatedly')
    • abhisaêkhâra
    • addhâna
    • addhayogas
    • Adhikaraòa-samathas
    • adhisîla: According to Buddhaghosa, moral transgression (adhisîla) is said with regard to offences against the pârâgika and saêghâdisesa rules, while transgressions in conduct(agghâkâra) consist in offences against the minor rules of the Pâtimokkha. Buddhaghosa's explanation is confirmed by the Mahâvagga IV, 16, 12.
    • âdibrahmakariya-sîla
    • Agapâla, banyan tree
    • agghâkâra: transgressions in conduct consist in offences against the minor rules of the Pâtimokkha.
    • aggibhâganâni
    • ahivâtakaroga: Buddhaghosa explains ahivâtakaroga by mâribyâdhi, and says: When this plague befalls a house, men and beasts in that house die; but he who breaks through wall or roof, or is "rogâ mâdigato(?)," may be saved.
    • âhundarikâ
    • Âkariya: Los deberes de un âkariya hacia su antevâsika, y de un antevâsika hacia su âkariya, se encuentran indicados en los chaps. 32, 33 (=Kullavagga VIII, 13, 14), son exactamente los mismos como aquellos de uno hacia su saddhivihârika y viceversa (chaps. 25, 26 = Kullavagga VIII, n, 12).
    • âkârya
    • akimbo
    • Akkâyika
    • akkâyika-kîvaraê
    • akkeka-kîvaraê
    • Âlâra Kâlâma
    • Amûlha-vinaya
    • anakkhariya
    • Ânanda
    • Anâtha Piòàika: There, at Sâvatthi, the Blessed One dwelt in the Getavana, the garden of Anâthapiòàika.
    • Anâthapiòàika: There the Blessed One dwelt at Sâvatthi, in the Getavana, the Ârâma of Anâthapiòàika.
    • anatikkantâ
    • anâvila-saêkappa: Tener objetivos puros, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • aôgula: Buddhaghosa prescribes to leave an interstice of one hattha, and he adds that the ancient Sinhalese commentaries differ as to the measure required for this interstice: the Kurundî requires one vidatthi, the Mahâpakkarî four aôgula.
    • aniggata-ratanake
    • anîhata-ratanake
    • anikkhantâ
    • Aniyatâ Dhammâ
    • aniyatâ dhammâ: Having been recited, the two aniyatâ dhammâ
    • Âôgirasa: tribe
    • Aôguttara Nikâya
    • aññâtakassa
    • Aññatitthiyas
    • Anotatta: lago
    • antaggâhikâ diùùhi
    • Antaragharaê paviùùhâ
    • Antaraghare
    • antimavatthu: Most probably antimavatthu refers to the pârâgika offences which require excommunication.
    • anuakkhariya
    • Anupadaggeyya
    • anupakhagga
    • Anupasampannaê padaso dhammaê vâkeyya
    • Anurâdhapura
    • Aññâtakoòàañña
    • Apadâna
    • Apadisitabbo
    • apakkuddhârakaê
    • apanîta
    • apariyositâya
    • âpattiyâ adassane
    • âpattiyâ appaùikamme
    • arahâ
    • Arahats: los seis (personas que han alcanzado la absoluta santidad) en el mundo.
    • ârâma
    • ârâmika
    • ariyasakka
    • ariyavâsas: The ten
    • Âsâlha: There are two periods, O Bhikkhus, for entering upon Vassa, the earlier and the later. The earlier time for entering (upon Vassa) is the day after the full moon of Âsâlha (June-July); the later, a month after the full moon of Âsâlha. These, O Bhikkhus, are the two periods for entering upon Vassa
    • âsâpenti
    • Âsavas
    • asekhâ dhammâ
    • asekhehi dhammehi
    • Âshâàha: the full moon day of Âshâàha or on the full moon day of the following month, Ärâvaòa
    • ashùakâ: festivals
    • Assagi
    • assâsapassâsâ
    • Aùani
    • atireka-kîvara
    • âtmanep
    • Attakâmapârikariyâ
    • aùùhâra mahâvihârâ: There were eighteen (?the MS. reads: aùùhâra mahâvihârâ) great Vihâras around Râgagaha included by the same boundary which Buddha himself had consecrated.
    • Atthavaòòanâ
    • atthikehi upaññâtaê maggaê
    • avanîta
    • âvasatha
    • âvasatha-piòdo
    • Avidyâ (Ignorance)
    • aviggâ (Ignorance)
    • Âvikatâ hi 'ssa phâsu hoti (for if it has been confessed, it is treated duly): duly for what purpose? In the due way for the attainment of the first Ghâna (and so on, as in § 7, down to :) of (all) good qualities.
    • Âvikâtabbâ: (it is to be confessed); it is .to be confessed before the Saêgha, or before a small chapter, or before one person.
    • Âyasmanto: this word 'âyasmanto' is an expression of friendliness, an expression of respect, an appellation that infers respectfulness and reverence.

    B


    • Bauddhas
    • Bhaddiya: el Venerable, el Santo
    • Bhâòavâras
    • Bhava: individuality
    • bhikkhugatika: Buddhaghosa: bhikkhugatika is a person that dwells in the same Vihâra with the Bhikkhus.
    • Bhikkhu-pâtimokkha
    • Bhikkhus: The names of the five Bhikkhus were, Koòdañña, Vappa, Bhaddiya, Mahânâma, Assagi
    • Bhikkhunî
    • Bhikkhunî's
    • Bhikkhunî-pâtimokkha
    • bhikkhunîdûsaka
    • Bhikkhunîkhandhaka
    • Bhikkhunîsaêgha
    • Bhikkhusaêgha
    • Bhikkhunovâda
    • bhiêsapeyya
    • Bodhi tree
    • bhummâ devâ
    • Bhûtagâma
    • Bhuttasmiê pâkittiya
    • Brahmâ Sahampati
    • Brahman svayambhû
    • brahmakâyika devas
    • Brâhmaòa
    • Buddha-vaêsa
    • Buddhaghosa
    • Buddhist Suttas

    CH


    • Chaukundi

    D


    • dadyâma
    • Daggâma
    • Dakkhiòâgiri
    • dantakaùùha
    • Dantapoòa
    • dasabhi k'ûpeto
    • dasadhammavidû
    • dasakammapathavidû
    • Devadatta
    • devalokas
    • Devanampiya King of Magâdha
    • dhammâ hetuppabhavâ
    • Dhamma Texts
    • Dhammapada
    • Dhammas
    • Dhataraùùha: uno de los cuatro dioses que guardan las cuatro direcciones del mundo (Dhataraùùha, Virûlìaka, Virûpakkha, Vessavaòa or Kuvera)
    • Digambaras
    • Dîpavaêsa
    • Dîpavaêsa
    • Diùùhi: delusion
    • diùùhamaôgalika
    • dubbhâsita: offences: The five classes of offences are, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa offences; the seven classes, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, thullakkaya, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa, dubbhâsita offences. See, for instance, Kullavagga IX, 3, 3.
    • Dukkaùa
    • dvangula
    • dvâra-kosa
    • dvâra-okâsa
    • dvittikkhadanassa

    E


    • Ehi bhikkhu
    • ehi-bhikkhu-upasampadâ
    • ekârakkha: Siendo guardado en una cosa, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • Ekuddeso
    • Evarûpâ parisâ: (an assembly like this): this refers to the assembly of Bhikkhus.

    G


    • Gagga
    • Gahapati
    • Gaina sects
    • gâma
    • gambhîre
    • gambu: tree
    • Gambudîpa (the Gambu Island, or India)
    • gamikâbhisaêkhâra
    • gaòamaggena gaòetuê
    • gantâghara
    • Garu-dhammâ
    • Gâtaka
    • Gâtaka Atthav.
    • Gâtaka Atthavaòòanâ
    • gâtarûparagata
    • Gaùilas: Los tres Gaùilas principales son, Uruvelâ Kassapa, Nadî Kassapa Gayâ Kassapa. De estos el Gaùilas Uruvelâ Kassapa es el jefe, el lider, el principal, el primero, y más elevado entre los quinientos Gaùilas; el Nadi Kassapa es el jefe .... (&c., down to highest over) de los trecientos Gaùilas, y el Gayâ Kassapa es el jefe .... (&c., down to highest over) de los docientos Gaùilas.
    • Gaùila Uruvelâ Kassapa
    • Gaudama
    • Gavampati
    • Gayâ Kassapa
    • Gayâsîsa: De acuerdo al General Cunningham, ('la cabeza de Gayâ') es la montaña de Brahmâyoni cerca de Gayâ Arch. Rep. III, 107.
    • Getavana
    • Gigghakûùa mountain ('the Vulture's Peak')
    • Ginakaritra
    • Ginas
    • Giribbaga
    • Gîvaka: was physician to king Bimbisâra, and one of the chief partisans of Buddha at the court of Râgagaha. See VIII, i, the introduction of the Sâmaññaphala Sutta, &c.
    • Gîvaka Komârabhakka
    • Gotama
    • guhotayas: Sacrificio Védico, los Vedas distinguen entre grandes y pequeños sacrificios (yagatayas y guhotayas

    H


    • Hammiya: Hammiya es un Pâsâda, which has an upper chamber placed on the topmost storey. Guhâ is a hut made of bricks, or in a rock, or of wood.
    • hâsa-dhamme
    • hattha-vikârena
    • hattha-vilaôghakena
    • Huhuôkagâtiko

    I


    • iddhâbhisaêkhâra
    • Iddhi
    • idhagata
    • ihagaya
    • Indakhîla
    • isipabbaggâm pabbaggâti
    • Isipatana
    • Itivuttaka

    K


    • Kaitrî pauròamâsî: The Brâhmaòa texts begin the year with the full moon day of the (uttarâ) Phâlgunî; the Sûtras mention, besides the Phâlgunî, another new-year's day, the Kaitrî pauròamâsî, which falls one month later. It was in connection with this dislocation of the beginning of the year that the annual festivals could be postponed accordingly. See Weber, Die vedischen Nachrichten von den Naxatra, II, p. 329 seq.
    • Kakudha: tree
    • Kalandaka: About the name of Kalandakanivâpa (seeds of Kalandaka? feeding ground for squirrels?), see the story related in Beal, Romantic Legend, &c., p. 315, where this place is said to be the gift of a merchant named Kalandaka. A dif ferent account is given by Spence Hardy, Manual, p. 194.
    • Kalandakanivâpa: At that time the Blessed One dwelt at Râgagaha, in the Veluvana, in the Kalandakanivâpa
    • kâlasâmaê vâ
    • Kamâ: Sensuality
    • Kamma
    • kammâra is said of a silversmith
    • kammârabhaòàu
    • Kammavâkas
    • Kaôkhâ Vitaraòî
    • Kappas: La Edades del Mundo, (world-ages)
    • Kapu-kapu
    • kara pi re
    • kara api re
    • kara pare
    • kârshâpaòas
    • Kassapa
    • Kathina
    • Kathinassa ubbâdra
    • Kattika-temâsa
    • Kattika-temâsi-puòòamâ
    • Katukka-Nipâta
    • Kâtumâsinî
    • Kathinuddhâra
    • Kattika: Kattika, which is frequently called Kaumuda
    • kâtumahârâgika devas: devas (gods belonging to the world of the four divine mahârâgas)
    • katurâpassena: Observando cuatro cosas, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • Kaumuda: Kattika, which is frequently called Kaumuda
    • kâyasaêkhâra
    • ketâpetvâ
    • Khabbaggiya Bhikkhus
    • khabbaggiyo
    • khalaôga: Las seis buenas cualidades, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • khalaôga
    • kammavâkâ
    • Khandhaka: texts
    • khandhas
    • khârikâga
    • Khattiya
    • khakkhattuparamaê
    • Khandhakas
    • khandhakavatta
    • kilesa: (evil passion)
    • kittasaêkhâra
    • kîvara
    • kîvaraê nitthitaê
    • kîvaraparihâra
    • Kodanâvatthu: Lugar Sagrado de Peregrinación.
    • kodayamâno
    • kodha
    • Kolita and Upatissa: Dos púpilos, alumnos de Sâriputta y Moggallâna
    • komudî kâtumâsini: The komudî kâtumâsini is the full moon day in the month Kattika, which is frequently called Kaumuda in the Epic literature; the epithet kâtumâsini refers to the Vedic Kâturmâsya festival, which falls upon that day (Kâtyâyana, Ärautasûtra V, 6, i).
    • Koòdañña
    • Kosambî
    • Khuddânukhuddakehi
    • kulupikâ bhikkhunî
    • Kullavagga
    • Kumârakassapa: At that time the venerable Kumârakassapa had received the upasampadâ ordination when he had completed the twentieth year from his conception (but not from his birth). Now the venerable Kuma rakassapa thought: The Blessed One has forbidden us to confer the upasampadâ ordination on persons under twenty years of age1, and I have completed my twentieth year (only) from my conception. Have I, therefore, received the upasampadâ ordination, or have I not received it?'
    • Kurundî: Buddhaghosa prescribes to leave an interstice of one hattha, and he adds that the ancient Sinhalese commentaries differ as to the measure required for this interstice: the Kurundî requires one vidatthi, the Mahâpakkarî four aôgula.

    L


    • lakkhaòa
    • Lalita Vistara
    • Laùùhivana: Laùùhivana (Sansk. yashùivana), literally, 'stick forest,' means a forest consisting of bambus.
    • Lohitaka

    M


    • Maddakukkhi: At that time the reverend Mahâ Kappina dwelt near Râgagaha, in the deer park of Maddakukkhi
    • Magâdha
    • Magadha Brâhmaòas
    • Magâdhaê samghaê
    • Magâdhe
    • Magâdheê
    • Mâgadhî
    • Magghima-Nikâya
    • Magghima-Sîla
    • Mahâ Kappina: At that time the reverend Mahâ Kappina dwelt near Râgagaha, in the deer park of Maddakukkhi
    • Mahâ Kassapa
    • Mahâ-padhâna Sutta
    • Mahâpagâpatî: Nanda was a son of Mahâpagâpatî, a half-brother of the Buddha. See the story of his conversion in Rh. D.'s Buddhist Birth Stories, p. 128 (later and fuller accounts can be seen in Hardy, Manual, p. 204 seq.; Beal, Romantic Legend, p. 369 seq.)
    • Mahâpakkarî: Buddhaghosa prescribes to leave an interstice of one hattha, and he adds that the ancient Sinhalese commentaries differ as to the measure required for this interstice: the Kurundî requires one vidatthi, the Mahâpakkarî four aôgula.
    • Mahaparinibbana Sutta
    • Mahâparinibbâna Sutta
    • Mahâ-parinibbâna
    • Maha-parinibbana Sutta
    • Mahâparinibbâna Sutta
    • mahâpurisa
    • Mahârâgas o Mahârâjas
    • Mahâ-seùùhi
    • Mahâ-Sila
    • Mahâ-sudassana Sutta
    • Mahâvagga / Mahavagga
    • Mahâvaêsa
    • Mahâvihâra
    • makkha
    • Manaê vulho ahosi: Buddhaghosa: îsakaê appattavulhabhâvo ahosi. Manaê is evidently the equivalent of Sanskrit manâk.
    • Manasikaroma: (we fix our minds on it): we listen to it with concentrated, not perplexed, not confused thoughts.
    • maòàala
    • mandâmukhiyo
    • manussanâgo: El elefante entre los hombres, la serpiente entre los hombres. El jefe entre los hombres.
    • mârgaëîrsha
    • mâribyâdhi: Buddhaghosa explains ahivâtakaroga by mâribyâdhi, and says: When this plague befalls a house, men and beasts in that house die; but he who breaks through wall or roof, or is "rogâ mâdigato(?)," may be saved.
    • matthakato vemagghato ti
    • meraya
    • myrobalan tree
    • Moggallâna: Sâriputta and Moggallâna, dos jóvenes Brâhmaòas.
    • Mrigadâwa, or Deer Park
    • Mukalinda, tree
    • mukha

    N


    • Na pallatthikâya
    • Na oguòùhito
    • Na thûpato omadditvâ
    • Na ukkuùikâya
    • Nadî Kassapa
    • Nâga: (or Serpent)
    • naishkâmya
    • naishkarmya
    • naishkramya
    • Nakkhambhakato
    • Nâvikareyya:' he does not show it, he does not unveil it, he does not make it evident, he does not declare it before the Saêgha, or before a small chapter, or before one person.
    • Nekkhamma
    • Nerañarâ: río
    • Nigrodhârâma: (Banyan Grove). Then the Blessed One, after having resided at Râgagaha as long as he thought fit, went forth to Kapilavatthu. Wandering from place to place he came to Kapilavatthu. There the Blessed One dwelt in the Sakka country, near Kapilavatthu, in the Nigrodhârâma (Banyan Grove).


    N cont.


    • Nerañgarâ: río
    • nidânas: el sistema de las doce
    • Nigaòùhas
    • nihata
    • nîhata
    • nîhaùa
    • nimmânarati devas
    • Nirvâna
    • Nissaggiyas
    • Nissaggiya
    • nissaggiya dhamma
    • nissaya

    Ñ


    • Ñânadassana
    • ñattidutiya kamma
    • ñattikatuttha kamma

    O


    • Onîta
    • Onîtapattapâòi
    • osâpenti
    • Otiòòo
    • ovâda
    • Ovadeyya

    P


    • pabbaggâ
    • pabbaggâbhisaêkhâra
    • pabbaggâniyakamma
    • pâdaghaêsana
    • pâdakathalika
    • pâdakathalikâ
    • pâdapîùha
    • Pâkittiya
    • pakkhasaêkanta
    • pakkuddhâro
    • Pâli Piùakas
    • palibodha
    • Paòàuka
    • paòâmanâ
    • pañaôga: Las cinco malas cualidades, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • pañka lenâni: Estos son los cinco tipos de viviendas (moradas) (pañka lenâni) que se declaran como permitidas, según el Kullavagga VI, i, 2. Estas son Vihâras, addhayogas, viviendas con historias (viviendas que hayan sido de anteriores religiosos), áticos y cuevas, se dicen que son las viviendas permitidas.
    • paññattaê
    • panunna pakkeka-sakka
    • pâpikâya ditthiyâ appaùinissagge
    • Pârâgika: The five classes of offences are, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa offences; the seven classes, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, thullakkaya, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa, dubbhasita offences. See, for instance, Kullavagga IX, 3, 3.
    • pârâgika dhammâ: The introduction having been recited, the four pârâgika dhammâ..
    • Pârâjikâ
    • Parampara-bhogane
    • paranimmitavasavatti devas
    • Paribbâgaka
    • paribbâgaka Sâriputta
    • Paribbâgakas
    • Paribbâgika
    • pârigâttaka: flower
    • pârikkattaka: flower
    • Parimaòàalaê
    • Parinibbâna
    • Parisuddhâ 'ti vedissâmi: (I shall understand that they are pure): I shall infer, I shall know.
    • pârisuddhi: I declare my pârisuddhi, take my pârisuddhi, proclaim my pârisuddhi
    • pârisuddhi-uposatha
    • Parivâra-pâtha
    • Parivâra-pâùha
    • Parivâsa
    • pârivâsika
    • parivattetvâ
    • Pariyâya
    • pasâdo uppanno hoti
    • passaddhakâya-saêkhâra: Ser fácilmente accesible, estar lleno de facilidad, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • paùhama-kattika-puòòamâ
    • Pâùidesaniya: The five classes of offences are, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa offences; the seven classes, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, thullakkaya, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa, dubbhasita offences. See, for instance, Kullavagga IX, 3, 3.
    • Paùikkasamuppâdavibhaôga
    • Pâtimokkha
    • pâtimokkhuddesaka
    • paùisâraòiyakamma
    • Pavâraòâ
    • pavâraòâsaêgaha
    • pavâreti
    • Pavârito
    • peyyâla: Thus3 a hundred and seventy-five systems of triads are produced which refer to resident and resident Bhikkhus. (Then follow the same cases with regard to) resident and incoming Bhikkhus, incoming and resident Bhikkhus, incoming and incoming Bhikkhus. By putting these words (successively) into the peyyâla, seven hundred triads are produced.
    • pisâkillika
    • Pitakas
    • Pratimoksha
    • Prati-muk
    • Pratimukha
    • pratyaya
    • Prâyaëkittika
    • Prâyaëkittîya
    • puggala
    • Pukkhâvissaggana
    • Pukkusa
    • Puòòagi

    R


    • Râga
    • Râgagaha
    • Râgagaha
    • râgaka
    • ragake
    • Râgâyatana
    • râgini
    • Râhula
    • raññe
    • rañño
    • ratanaka
    • Ratanas
    • Ratanasammataê
    • Èishi
    • rogâ mâdigato: Buddhaghosa explains ahivâtakaroga by mâribyâdhi, and says: When this plague befalls a house, men and beasts in that house die; but he who breaks through wall or roof, or is "rogâ mâdigato(?)," may be saved.
    • rûpa: five elements of existence, rûpa, vedanâ, saññâ, saêkhârâ, viññâòa.
    • rûpa-sutta
    • Rûpiyakkhaddaka

    S


    • Sabbe va santâ' (all of us): as many as are present in that assembly, aged, young, and middle-aged (Bhikkhus), are denoted by sabbe va santâ
    • Sabbakâmî
    • sabhogaê
    • Sabhogane kule
    • sabhogana kula
    • sabhoganaê
    • saddhivihârikas
    • Sâdhukaê suòoma' (we hear it well): admitting its authority, fixing our minds on it, we repeat the whole of it in our thoughts.
    • Sagathavagga Samyutta
    • Sahadhammika
    • Sâketa
    • Sakka: (Sakra. or Indra) the king of the devas
    • Sakka Suddhodana
    • Sakkakkaê
    • Sakya: tribe
    • samabhâritaê
    • Samâdhis: (states of self-concentration)
    • samaggâ
    • Samaggena saêghena
    • samâkase
    • Samaòa Sakyaputta, El Gran Samaòa Sakyaputta, un asceta de la tribu Sakya, the great, an ascetic of the Sakya tribe;
    • Samaòa-bhatta-samayo
    • Samaòa Gotama
    • Samaòa Gotama Sakyaputta
    • Samanta-Pâsâdikâ
    • Sâmaòera: Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a Bhikkhunî. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a sikkhamânâ, a sâmaòera, a sâmaòerî, one who has abandoned the precepts, one who is guilty of an extreme offence. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.
    • Sâmaòerî: Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a Bhikkhunî. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a sikkhamânâ, a sâmaòera, a sâmaòerî, one who has abandoned the precepts, one who is guilty of an extreme offence. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.
    • Samanubhâsitabbo
    • Samaòuddeso
    • Sâmaññaphala Sutta
    • Samâpattis: (the eight attainments of the four Ghânas and four of the eight Vimokkhas
    • samavayasadhesana: Buscando las Cosas Rectas o Correctas, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • sambodhi
    • Sambuddha
    • Saêgha
    • Saêghâdisesa
    • Saêghâdisesa
    • saêghâdisesa dhammâ: Having been recited, the thirteen saêghâdisesa dhammâ
    • Saêghamittâ
    • Saêgîti Sutta: The Saêgîti Sutta gives the ten Noble States, as follows: 1. being free from the five bad qualities (pañaôga) 2. being possessed of the six good qualities (khalaôga), 3. being guarded in the one thing (ekârakkha), 4. observing four things (katurâpassena), 5. rejecting each of the four false truths (panunna pakkeka-sakka), 6. seeking right things (samavayasa dhesana), 7. having pure aims (anâvila-saêkappa), 8. being full of ease (passaddhakâya-saêkhâra), 9. being emancipated in heart (suvimuttakitta), 10. being emancipated in ideas (suvimuttapañña). The Saêgîti then further enlarges on the meaning of each of these ten.
    • Saêkhâra-Yamaka
    • sammâdiùùhi
    • sammâñâòa (right knowledge)
    • sammâvimutti (right emancipation)
    • Sampagânamusâvâd' assa hoti: (he commits an intentional falsehood): what is intentional falsehood? It is a sin.
    • samutkarsha
    • Saôghâ
    • Saôghâdisesa
    • saêghâdisesa: The five classes of offences are, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa offences; the seven classes, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, thullakkaya, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa, dubbhasita offences. See, for instance, Kullavagga IX, 3, 3.
    • Saêghakamma
    • Saêghârâma
    • Saêgîti Sutta
    • saêkhârâ: Los cinco elementos de la Existencia: rûpa, vedanâ, saññâ, saêkhârâ, viññâòa.
    • saêkhâra-khandha
    • Sammâdiùùhisuttanta
    • sammâñâòa: (Recto conocimiento, right knowledge)
    • sammâvimutti (Correcta emancipación, right emancipation)
    • Sammukhâ-vinaya
    • sammuti: I.e. to abolish the character of uposathâgâra, conferred on the Vihâra &c. by the act of sammuti
    • sampavâreti
    • Saôkhâyana Gèihya
    • Santaê bhikkhuê
    • Santî âpatti: (an existing offence): an offence which has been committed, or which has been committed and not been atoned for.
    • saññâ: five elements of existence, rûpa, vedanâ, saññâ, saêkhârâ, viññâòa.
    • Sappâòaka
    • Sappinî: The river which Mahâ Kassapa crossed on his way to the Veluvana was the Sappinî, which rises in the Gigghakûùa mountain.
    • saraòagamanas
    • Saramânena: (by him who remembers it); by him who knows it and is conscious of it.
    • Saramâno: (remembering it): knowing it, being conscious of it.
    • sârayamâno
    • Sâriputta
    • Sâriputta
    • Sati-vinaya
    • Satiê upaùùhâpetvâ
    • Sâvatthi
    • sayani-ghara
    • sekha: The stage of a sekha, i. e. a person who has attained to any stage in the Noble Eightfold Path (such as sotâpattiphala, &c.) inferior to the highest (Arahatship)
    • Sekha-sammatâni kulâni
    • sekhapaññatti
    • sekha-sîla: Spence Hardy (Manual, p. 493) gives the term sekha-sîla, which he explains as the observance of precepts in order to become a sekha. See also Hardy's note on adibrahmâkariya-sila, 1. 1. p. 492.
    • Sekhiya
    • Senâninigama
    • Senâpatigrâma
    • Seniya Bimbisara: rey de Magadha
    • seùùhi
    • seùùhi-gahapati
    • seùùhi-ùùhâna
    • seùùhitâ
    • Sîhalaùùhakathâ
    • sikkhâpakkakkhâtâ
    • sikkhâ pakkakkhâtâ hoti
    • sikkhaê pakkakkhâti: We have no doubt that this is the correct translation of vibbhamati (see I, 39, 5). The difference between vibbhamati (he returns to the world) and sikkhaê pakkakkhâti (he abandons the precepts) seems to be that the former is an informal, and the latter a formal, renunciation of the Order.
    • sikkhamânâ: Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a Bhikkhunî. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence. Let no one, O Bhikkhus, recite the Pâtimokkha in a seated assembly (of Bhikkhus) before a sikkhamânâ, a sâmaòera, a sâmaòerî, one who has abandoned the precepts, one who is guilty of an extreme offence. He who does, commits a dukkaùa offence.
    • sikkhamâòâs
    • Sikkhâpadâni, literally, 'Paths of Training.'
    • Siêhalese
    • Siôgiloòa
    • So âvikareyya: he may show it, unveil it, make it evident, declare it before the Saêgha (the full chapter of Bhikkhus), or before a small number, or before one person.
    • sotâpattiphala
    • Ärâvaòa: month
    • Subâhu
    • Subhûti
    • Sudinna, sin of
    • Sugata
    • Sugataôgulena
    • sukigharaê
    • Sumaôgala
    • Sumaôgala Vilâsinî
    • Supatiùùha
    • Suppavâyitaê
    • surâ
    • Suru-suru
    • Suttadharâ
    • Suttanta
    • Suttas
    • Suttantikas
    • Sutta Pitaka
    • Sutta-vibhaôga
    • Suttavibhangara
    • Suttadharâ
    • suvaòòakâraputto
    • suvimuttakitta: Tener el corazón emancipado, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • suvimuttapañña: Estar emancipado en Ideas, una de las diez ariyavâsas según el Buddhaghosa
    • svayampati
    • Svetambaras

    T


    • tagganiyakamma
    • Taòhâ, Desire
    • tâni; madhu phâòitaê
    • Tasmâ:' for that reason.
    • tassa upalâpeti
    • Tassapâpiyyasikâ
    • tatragata
    • tatthagaya
    • Tâvatiêsa: Cielo
    • tâvatiêsa devas
    • Tevigga Sutta
    • Teviggu Sutta
    • theyya-saêkhâtaê
    • Thullaccaya
    • Thullakkaya: The five classes of offences are, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa offences; the seven classes, the pârâgika, saêghâdisesa, thullakkaya, pâkittiya, pâùidesaniya, dukkaùa, dubbhasita offences. See, for instance, Kullavagga IX, 3, 3. thullakkaya is a (grave) offence, (grave sin)
    • ti-kîvara
    • Tika-Nipâta
    • tikîvarena avippavâsa
    • Timaòàalaê
    • Tiòavatthâraka
    • Tipallattha-miga Gâtaka
    • tirakkhâna-viggâ
    • Titthiya: school
    • titthiyapakkhasaêkanta
    • Tûlaê
    • tulâdhâram
    • tulâtaramuòàako(read tulâdhâram)
    • Tuòhî bhavitabbaê: (he ought to remain silent): he ought to accept (the recitation of the Pâtimokkha without any answer), he ought not to utter anything.

    U


    • Uddaka Râmaputta
    • Uddhakka
    • Uddisissâmi
    • ukkhekkhâmi
    • ukkhepaniyakamma
    • Ukkhitto anosârito
    • ukkinatha
    • ummattakasammuti
    • upadhis
    • upadhisaêkhaye
    • upadhyâya
    • upagghâya
    • Upajjhâya
    • Upalâpeyya
    • Upâli
    • Upananda
    • Upananda Sakyaputta: the venerable Upananda Sakyaputta
    • Upanikkhittaê vâ sâdiyeyya
    • upâsaka
    • upâsaka Udena
    • Upasampadâ
    • Upasampadâ-kammavâka: With these sections compare the previous chapters 12, 28 and following, 36 and following. The watt is prescribed in this chapter, together with the Three Refuges Formula prescribed in chap. 12, 4, the whole of chap. 77, and the Four Interdictions form together the current ceremony of ordination (the upasampadâ-kammavâkâ) as now still in use in the Order. See the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, New Series, VII, p. i.
    • upasampanna
    • Upasena Vaôgantaputta
    • Upatissa: Púpilo o alumno de Sâriputta y Moggallâna
    • Uposatha
    • uposatha-pamukha
    • uposathapamukha
    • uposathâgâra: I.e. to abolish the character of uposathâgâra, conferred on the Vihâra &c. by the act of sammuti
    • Uposatho paòòaraso
    • Uttara Kuru
    • uttarimanussa-dhammaê

    V


    • Vadâno
    • vagga
    • vakîsaêkhâra
    • Vânaprasthas
    • Vappa: el Venerable, el Santo
    • varuòapraghâsâs: Thus the sacrifice of the varuòapraghâsâs, with which the Brahmans began the rainy season, was to be held either on the full moon day of Âshâàha or on the full moon day of the following month, Ärâvaòa, quite in accordance with the Buddhistical rules about the vassupanâyikâ.
    • vassa
    • vassâvâsikaê
    • vassupanâyikâ: The full moon day of Âshâàha or on the full moon day of the following month, Ärâvaòa
    • Vedanâ: five elements of existence, rûpa, vedanâ, saññâ, saêkhârâ, viññâòa.
    • Veluvana: Bosque de Bambú.
    • Veluvana monastery
    • Vesâlî, Council of
    • Vessavaòa: uno de los cuatro dioses que guardan las cuatro direcciones del mundo (Dhataraùùha, Virûlìaka, Virûpakkha, Vessavaòa or Kuvera)
    • vibbhamati: We have no doubt that this is the correct translation of vibbhamati (see I, 39, 5). The difference between vibbhamati (he returns to the world) and sikkhaê pakkakkhâti (he abandons the precepts) seems to be that the former is an informal, and the latter a formal, renunciation of the Order.
    • Vibhaôga
    • Vibhaôga
    • vidatthi: Buddhaghosa prescribes to leave an interstice of one hattha, and he adds that the ancient Sinhalese commentaries differ as to the measure required for this interstice: the Kurundî requires one vidatthi, the Mahâpakkarî four aôgula.
    • Vihâra
    • Vikâle
    • Vilâsinî
    • Vimala
    • Vimokkhas
    • Vinaya
    • Vinaya-dharâ
    • Vinayadharâ
    • Vinayapâmokkhâ
    • Vinaya Pitaka
    • Vinaya-Samukase
    • Vinaya Texts
    • viññâòa: five elements of existence, rûpa, vedanâ, saññâ, saêkhârâ, viññâòa.
    • Virûlìaka: uno de los cuatro dioses que guardan las cuatro direcciones del mundo (Dhataraùùha, Virûlìaka, Virûpakkha, Vessavaòa or Kuvera)
    • Virûpakkha: uno de los cuatro dioses que guardan las cuatro direcciones del mundo (Dhataraùùha, Virûlìaka, Virûpakkha, Vessavaòa or Kuvera)
    • Visâkhâ Migâramâtâ
    • Visuddhâpekkhena: (by him who desires to become pure): by him who wishes to atone for it and to make himself pure of it.
    • vitakkavikârâ
    • vyagra

    Y


    • yagatayas: Sacrificio Védico, los Vedas distinguen entre grandes y pequeños sacrificios (yagatayas y guhotayas
    • Yagñavalkya
    • yâma devas
    • Yasa
    • Yassa siyâ âpatti: (he who has committed an offence): he who, whether an aged or young or middle-aged Bhikkhu, has committed some offence belonging to the five classes of offences or to the seven classes of offences
    • Yathâ kho pana pakkekapuùùhassa veyyâkaraòaê hoti: (as a single person that has been asked a question answers it): as a single person that has been asked a question by another one, would answer it, thus (those who are present) in that assembly ought to understand: He asks me.'
    • yâvatatiyakâ
    • Yâvatatiyaê anussâvitaê hoti: (it has been solemnly proclaimed three times): it has been solemnly proclaimed once, and the second time, and the third time.
    • Yebhuyyasikâ
    • Yoganas
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